Skip to main content

Full text of "ANNUAL REPORT - ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD (fiscal year ended March 31, 1993)"

.Government 
l^biicutions 



IMTARIO ENERGY BOARD 




Table of Contents 



Message from the Chair 



Board Membership 



Introduction 

Ontario's Energy System 

OEB Roles and Responsibilities 

Board Structure and Resources 



1992-93 HIGHLIGHTS 

(Year Ending March 31,1993) 

Fostering Access and Participation 

Improving Procedures 

Administrative Justice Community 

Streamlining Operations 

The Regulatory Agenda 

Gas Integrated Resource Planning Examined 

Hydros Bulk Power Rates Reviewed 

Natural Gas Rates Hearings 

Pipeline Applications 

Other Reports 



List of Proceedings 



Public Participation 



Glossary 



The cover depicts a 

core sample obtained by 

drilling. In the natural 

gas industiy core samples 

are taken to define the 

structural characteristics 

and integrity ojgas 

storage pools. 



The Ontario Energy Board is located at 

2300 Yonge Street, Suite 2601 

Toronto, Ontario M4P 1E4 (416) 481-1967 

Copies ojthis and other Board publications may be purchased from the Ontario Government 
Bookstore, 880 Bay Street, Toronto. Telephone (416) 326-5320. 

Out-of-town customers please contact Publications Ontario, Mail Orders, 50 Grosvcnor Street, 
Toronto, Ontario M7A 1N8 Toll-free long distance: 1-800-668-9938. 

ISSN 0317-4891 

Photographs of Board members by Vincenzo Pietropaulo. Other photographs courtesy of Centra 
Gas Ontario Inc., The Consumers' Gas Company Ltd., Ontario Hydro, and Union Gas limited. 

©Printed in Canada on Beckett Expressions containing 50% recycled fibre with 25% post- 
consumer waste. 




Minister 
Minis tre 



Ministry of 
Environment 
and Energy 



Ministere de 
I'Enviropnement 
et de I'Energie 



1 35 St Clair Avenue West 

Suite 100 

Toronto ON M4V1P5 



1 35, avenue St Clair ouest 

Bureau 1 00 

Toronto ON M4V1P5 



The Honourable Henry N.R. Jackman 
Lieutenant Governor of the 
Province of Ontario 



I hereby submit the annual report of the Ontario Energy Board. 
It reviews the events and activities of the fiscal year of 1992 
1993. 

Respectfully submitted, 




tjititim^ 



C.J. (Bud) Wildman 
Minister 



@ 



100% Unbleached Post -Consumer Stock 



0761 G (04/93) 



Message from the Chair 



i 4 .->*'. 









Regulatory Tribunals Must Adapt 
to Changing Economic Conditions 



T: 



he ontario energy board is proud to take an active role in 
the natural gas and electricity sectors. these sectors 
of our economy provide an essential service to thousands of 
businesses and millions of homes safely, reliably, and at least 
cost, With due consideration to environmental concerns. 



While endeavouring to ensure 
that rates are fair, that supply is secure, 
and that the public interest is upheld, 
the OEB must be sensitive and aware 
that our actions could have distorting 
and counterproductive effects if we are 
not careful. 

In an era of budget constraints 
and rapidly changing market condi- 
tions, regulators, as well as utilities 
and their customers, must promote 
innovation and seek proactive and 
collaborative solutions to industry 
problems, if natural gas and electrici- 
ty are to continue to be available to 
consumers at fair prices. To be effec- 
tive and efficient, regulatory tribunals 
must be willing to adjust to changing 
circumstances. 

As part of our continuing search 
for improvement, the Board has 
undertaken several initiatives includ- 
ing alternative dispute resolution, a 
two-year test period, a review of our 
legislation and joint or generic hear- 
ings. We have implemented new 



policies and procedures for inter- 
vener cost awards, reducing the time 
it takes to process cost applications. 
We are also revamping our system for 
monitoring the financial performance 
of gas utilities, and we are modifying 
the accounting system used by utili- 
ties to report financial information. 
The underlying objective of all of 
these initiatives is to improve the reg- 
ulatory process and procedure at the 
OEB. To the extent we are successful, 
regulatory costs should be reduced 
and the quality of our regulation 
should be enhanced. 

Details of the Board's more note- 
worthy accomplishments this year, 
and summaries of significant deci- 
sions and reports, are highlighted in 
this annual report. These details are 
evidence of the hard work and team- 
work shown by the many talented 
and experienced Board members and 
staff. It is through the efforts of these 
dedicated professionals that the Board 
has accomplished so much this year. 



In the interests of efficiency, the 
Board is encouraging the continued 
use of the two-year test period and 
settlement conferences, both of 
which were introduced last year. A 
two-year test period allows us to set 
rates for two years in one proceeding 
in order to save hearing resources. 
Settlement conferences foster the 
sharing of ideas and concerns, often 
resulting in the resolution of out- 
standing issues before a formal hear- 
ing begins. A cooperative approach 
improves the decision-making 
process both in and out of the hear- 
ing room, since all parties are given 
the opportunity to participate more 
fully and informally Although the 
immediate benefits of using settle- 
ments are not conclusive, the process 
has been well received by the indus- 
try, and we look forward to achieving 
the long-term benefits that can result 
from using a more cooperative 
approach. 

Regulator) 7 efficiency can also be 
improved through the use of joint or 
generic hearings. These hearings are 
used when the issues under review 
must be resolved expeditiously, when 
the decisions on the issues could 
have broad policy and regulatory 
impacts, and when cost efficiencies 



are possible by hearing common 
issues in one proceeding. 

Effective regulation in the 1990s 
involves concern for the natural envi- 
ronment we all share. Last year the 
Board recognized the connections 
between energy, the environment and 
the economy by initiating a multiple- 
step process referred to as the gas inte- 
grated resource planning (1RP) 
proceeding. IRP is a method of plan- 
ning for gas utilities in which the 
expected demand for gas is met by the 
least costly mix of supply-side and 
demand-side options. This year we 
concentrated our efforts on the 
demand-side-management (DSM) 
aspects of IRP through a generic hear- 
ing. This phase of the proceeding has 
resulted in formalized guidelines for 
the implementation of a utility-specif- 
ic DSM plan that will appropriately 
balance environmental and economic 
considerations. We recommended 
that the natural gas utilities form a 
joint collaborative with diverse stake- 
holders to identify and recommend 
methods of including the costs and 
benefits of social and environmental 
factors in the rates charged to natural 
gas customers. 



Innovations 

■ Alternative Dispute Resolution 

■ Two-Year Test Period 

■ Joint or Generic Hearings 



Envviromental Issues 

■ Gas Integrated Resource Planning 

m Electrical Energy Management 

■ Pipeline Construction Guidelines 



As part of the review of pro- 
posed increases in Ontario Hydro's 
1993 bulk power rates, we took note 
of Ontario Hydro's demand-side 
activities. Our report to the Ministry 
emphasized that demand-side mea- 
sures must be subjected to the same 
rigorous scrutiny as supply-side 
measures. We also recommended 
that Hydro arrange a series of work- 
shops with stakeholders to further 
review and develop its energy man- 
agement programs and that it make 
additional efforts to evaluate and 
monitor these programs to ensure 
that program dollars are well spent. 

Rounding out our initiatives 
designed to improve our effective- 
ness in responding to environmental 
concerns, we are revising our envi- 
ronmental guidelines for locating, 
constructing and operating pipelines 
in Ontario. We are working on 
changes to cover additional activi- 
ties, to respond to urban planning 
needs and to enhance public partici- 
pation. 

Achieving more effective regula- 
tion requires greater public involve- 
ment and open lines of communication 
with the varied groups having an inter- 
est in our hearings. To strengthen our 
communications effort, we have 



developed a Regulatory Agenda 
newsletter to keep interested parties 
informed of our activities, and we 
have also introduced the use of exec- 
utive summaries as part of our rate 
decisions for the convenience of 
readers. Public involvement is 
enhanced through the Intervenor 
Funding Project Act (IFPA), extended 
by the government until 1996. The 
IFPA will continue to assist qualified 
interested parties who would other- 
wise not be able to finance their own 
participation in regulator)' activities. 

With quality-of-service improve- 
ments in mind, we have also initiated 
a review of the existing legislation 
and regulations that govern our 
operations. The main purpose of 
reviewing the legislation is to provide 
the government with recommenda- 
tions that reflect changes in the mar- 
ketplace, such as the deregulation of 
gas prices and the introduction of 
direct purchase options, which could 
not have been contemplated when 
the legislation was enacted. In addi- 
tion, our Draft Rules of Practice and 
Procedure, which were amended as 
of January 1, 1993 to reflect the 
Board's new cost-award process, are 
also being reviewed as part of our 
focus on quality improvement. 



Maintaining our involvement 
with the administrative justice com- 
munity is necessary to ensure that the 
Board is both up to date with impor- 
tant events, and not out of step with 
other jurisdictions. As part of my 
contribution to the Boards outreach 
efforts, I am currently serving as 
Secretary of the agency Chairs' 
Section of the Society of Ontario 
Adjudicators and Regulators, and act- 
ing as co-chair of the 1993 confer- 
ence of the Canadian Council of 
Administrative Tribunals. I have also 
been involved with the Canadian 
Association of Members of Public 
Utility Tribunals, by chairing its 
Energy Committee and sitting on its 
Executive Committee. 

While the OEB has been 
attempting to boost efficiency and 
effectiveness, the government as a 
whole has been moving in the same 
direction. The formation of the 
Ministry of Environment and Energy 
in February 1993 combines two areas 
with increasingly strong links. Also, 
the Management Board of Cabinet 
has undertaken a review of Ontario's 
system of agencies, boards and com- 
missions designed to streamline oper- 
ations. The OEB actively participated 
on the task forces, which produced 



certain directions that were approved 
in principle by the Cabinet. 

Looking at the future, one of my 
main priorities is to work together 
with our stakeholders to improve the 
quality of the services our Board pro- 
vides. We will be actively soliciting 
input to ensure that the needs of all 
our stakeholders are considered. 
Given current market conditions and 
our expectations of where deregula- 
tion and other key issues will take us 
next, we must consider our mandate 
within the context of emerging 
trends and determine the future 
direction that our Board must take to 
best serve our customers. Only 
when we take this long-term 
approach can we ensure that our 
efforts will be in the best interests of 
the public and the gas industry. 

By continuing to strive to 
improve the efficiency and effective- 
ness of our operations, the Board will 
be able to continue to meet the 
needs of those who rely upon us. 




Marie C. Rounding 
Chair 




members as of March 31, 1993 



Board Membership 



Chair: 

Marie C. Rounding 




Marie Rounding a lawyer and former 
teacher, was appointed OEB Chair effective 
January 1, 1992. She had served as a mem- 
ber oj the Ontario Energy Board from J 984 
to 1987. Otha previous positions include: 
legal counsel to the Ontario Ministry oj 
Energy; Director-Legal Services, Ministry of 
Financial institutions; and Directo) oj the 
( rown Law Office - Civil Law, Ministry oj 
the Attorney General. Ms. Rounding is also 
Chair oj Doctors Hospital in Toronto. 

Vice-Chair: 
Orville J. Cook 




( honored accountant Orville Cook was in 
public practice bejore coming to work joi 
the Board in 1961. He has served the 

a a number oj senior stall positions, 
including Manager- Financial Analysis, 
Directo) oj Operations and Energy Returns 
i fficer. Mr. Cook became a member oj the 

' in January 1985 and served as 
Acting ( hau during the second halfoj 
1991 He was named Vice ( fiai) - ffi 

in Novemhei 1991. 



Members: 



Carl A. Wolf Jr. 



Judith C. Allan 





Carl Wolf joined the Board 
in September 1986 after a 
varied 29-year carea with 

Union Carbide, where he 
administered the company's 
em rg) affairs. Priortohis 
appointment, he was also 
Vice-Chairman of the 
industrial Gas Users Association and a member of a 
number of industry associations and government ener- 
gy -policy groups. 

* Richard R. Perdue 

A lawyer, Richard Perdue 
was named a part-time 
member of the Board in 
February 1990. He for- 
med as a full-time 
Board membe) from 1981 
to 1986. 



C. William W. Darling 

William Darling was 
appointed to the Board 
in February 1990 fol- 
lowing an extended 
careerwith C-l-Llnc, a 
major consumer qfener- 
gy i/i heating, process 
and feedstock applica- 
tions. His last 10 years at C-l-L were spent in 
purchasing and policy-development positions 
related to energy and feedstocks. He holds a 
master oj science degree in chemical engineering 
from Queens University. 

Pamela W. Chapple 

Formerly with the 
Ontario Securities 

Commission, fawyei 
Pamela Chappie joined 
the Ontario Ena 
Board in July 1990. 
She has had experience 
with otherboards (i/id 
; i/u(' oj the Ombudsman. 






Formerly Manager- Market 
Analysis and Forecasts at 
JiansCanada Pipelines, 
Judith Allan became a Board 
member in September 1990. 
She holds a bachelor oj mathe- 
matics degree as well as mas- 
ters degrees in economics and 
business administration. 



Edward J. Robertson 

Before joining the OEB 
in May 1992, Edward 
Robertson was Chairman 
of the Manitoba Public 
I^VL ' ^^^ Utilities Board. He has 
I «Sw fl had extensive private 

I W. j experience in the United 

J& ! Kingdom. His Canadian 

public sector posts include CEO of the Manitolxi 
Telephone System. 




Cheryl L. Cottle 




Lawyer Cheryl Cottle was 
formerly a senior legal coun- 
sel with the Ministry 

Attorney General, assigned to 
the Automobile Insuri 
Review Project. She • 
OEB solicitor from 1 985 to 
1988 and was appointed a 
Board member in May 1992. 



Judith B. Simon 

An emironmental scien- 
tist, Judith V 
named apart-time 
Board member in May 
1992. She was Joi 
a manager with the 
Ministries oj Industry, 
Trade and Technology 
and oj Environment, and also has worked as a 
planner for the Ministry of Energy. She is currently 
self-tmployed as an environmental consultant spe- 
cializing in cnvironmcntLil assessment and en 
ment-economy issues. 
* Denotes pail-time member. 




Introduction 



Ontario's Energy System 



ONTARIO RELIES HEAVILY ON NATURAL GAS AS AN ENERGY 
SOURCE AND AS A RAW MATERIAL OR FEEDSTOCK IN THE PRO- 
DUCTION OF CHEMICALS. NATURAL GAS IS THE MAJOR FUEL FOR ALL 
SECTORS OF THE ECONOMY EXCEPT TRANSPORTATION, AND IT IS THE 
PRIMARY FUEL USED TO HEAT SPACE AND WATER IN THE PROVINCE. 

Electricity is also a key energy source. Many of its uses - like electrical equipment and 
computers - are indispensable to modern economies. 

The industrial, residential and commercial/institutional sectors all depend mainly on natur- 
al gas for their energy needs. In fact, Ontario uses more natural gas than any other province, and 
accounts for about 40 per cent of the total Canadian demand for natural gas. 

Natural gas provides approximately 32 per cent of the energy consumed in Ontario, while 
electricity provides about 19 per cent. Oil, coal, wood and natural gas liquids such as propane 
provide the balance of Ontario's energy consumption. 
Natural Gas Sale and Distribution 

Ontario obtains some 94 per cent of its natural gas from the Western provinces by way of 
the TransCanada Pipelines and associated systems. In addition, we import about 2 per cent of 
our gas from the United States and produce approximately 3 per cent ourselves. 

Most natural gas in Ontario is distributed by three utilities, each holding franchises to 
transport gas in specific areas of the province. Since the transportation of gas involves a capital- 
intensive network of pipelines and storage facilities, a monopoly arrangement is most efficient. 
It avoids costly duplication of facilities. 

The commodity cost of gas from Western 
Canada accounts for about one third of the typical 
residential sales rate. The balance of the rate cov- 
ers transportation from the West and the distribu- 
tion and operating costs of the utility. 

Since the mid-'80s deregulation has brought a 
number of changes to the market. Wholesale nat- 
ural gas prices are no longer set by the Alberta and 
federal governments. Instead, competition exists 
in the sale of gas: buyers may purchase directly 
from producers or they may continue to purchase 
from distributors. For gas purchased directly, 
transportation arrangements must be negotiated 
with TransCanada Pipelines. 

Small gas users often participate in direct pur- 
chase arrangements as part of a large purchasing 
group. The company organizing the group typical- 
ly negotiates with producers or marketers for gas 



Natural Gas Franchise Areas 



Total Natural Gas 
Demand 

Billions oj Cubic Metres 
Volumes Adjusted for 
Degree-Day Variations 
25 



20 



15 



10- 













mill 

'87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 



■ Transportation 

■ Agriculture 

■ Industrial 
Commercial 

■ Residential 
Source: Ontario Natural 

Gas Association. 



ONTARIO 




Residential 
Energy Demand 

Petajoules 

Gas & Oil Adjusted jor 
Degree-Day Variations 
500 



400 



300 



200 



100 



ftttn 
■■ii 










'87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 

■ Liquid Petroleum Gas 

■ Electricity 
Light Fuel Oil 

■ Natural Gas 
Source: Ontario Natural 

Gas Association. 



supply on behalf of all participants, and makes the necessary transportation arrangements. 
Electric Power 

In Ontario a provincially owned corporation, Ontario Hydro, is responsible for most gen- 
eration and transmission of electricity. 

In the vast majority of cities and towns, a municipal utility owns and operates the local 
electrical distribution system. The municipal utility buys power wholesale from Ontario Hydro 
and then sells it to residential and business customers. Ontario Hydro also sells directly to 
some 836,000 rural retail customers and 103 major industrial customers. 

The wholesale rates that Hydro charges municipalities and large industrial customers are 
referred to as bulk power rates. These rates have a strong impact on Ontario's overall energy 
marketplace. 

Ontario's Gas Pipeline System 



1 






/ 


~ r 

1 


~ — _ _ 


/ ttCccc 'et c , Ontario 




1 W tCMCttttttttt, 


\ 1 


Quebec 


y^ Lake Superior""- — i 


V 




*"**••• — "7 ^'i / 


1 




****••• — i ? 


i\ 




/**^ 


> — ^ S f <^ 


/ ' J^~^v 






LEGEND /L Z /Jy. 

cccc TransCanada PipeLincs j 3 j 

■■■■ Union Gas I * / 

••"• Centra Gas I g 

•■•• Great Lakes in \ V 


\ LAKE "O \ 2 c'-'^lL 
HURON A-^[X» ,€*' V X. 


■ ■■ Panhandle Eastern <t 


.1/. — ^} 




j / 


// 




^— Empire State 1 


/C." /" "; / 




••• Tennessee Gas V ^ 
^» Iroquois 4? 


^isr^t^ 


M U N 1 T E D 


Cv^ 


X States 


m 


-x / J 





OEB Roles and Responsibilities 



The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) regulates natural gas 
utilities and reviews changes in ontario hydro's bulk 
power rates. we also advise the minister of environment 
and energy, the minister of natural resources and the 
Lieutenant Governor in Council on energy matters. 



The Board's primary objective is to guarantee that the public interest is served and protected. 
When setting or recommending rates, the Board must balance the competing interests of con- 
sumers, investors and the environment. 
Setting Natural Gas Rates 

In Ontario, private gas utilities cannot set their own selling prices. They are required by 
legislation to submit their proposed rates to the OEB for review and approval. Rates are estab- 
lished for each utility following a public hearing, which typically lasts three to four weeks. 
Where users purchase gas directly from producers, the OEB controls the rates that utilities may 
charge for transporting the gas in Ontario. 

Gas sales rates vary among classes of customers: residential, commercial, industrial and 
wholesale. In setting rates, the Board first determines an appropriate level of expenses incurred 
by the utility to meet total system requirements. We then determine the costs imposed on the 
system by the varying demands of different classes of customers. 

Residential demand for natural gas as a heating fuel, for example, changes according to the 
weather and the time of day. It costs more on a per-unit basis to provide service to residential 
users than to industrial customers, which use relatively large amounts of gas at a more constant 
level. 

The Board sets rates as low as possible while still providing investors in the utility with the 
opportunity to earn a fair return. Rates should be just and reasonable for both customer and 
shareholder. 

In making its decisions, the Board weighs the utility's past, present and projected expenses 
and asks whether the costs are prudent. It also considers current and forecast economic condi- 
tions and trends, the earnings expectations for the utility operators, and the quality of service the 
utility provides. 

If a utility's financial picture changes significantly between rate hearings, the Board may 
hold an interim hearing to grant rate relief to either the company or its customers. Interim rates 
are subject to revision and are not final until the main rates application has been heard and a 
decision and orders issued. 

The Board regulates the rates charged by four gas utilities in Ontario: The Consumers' Gas 
Company Ltd. (Consumers Gas), Union Gas Limited (Union), Centra Gas Ontario Inc. (Centra) 
and Natural Resource Gas Limited (NRG). 



Rates should be just and 
reasonable for both 
customer and shareholder. 



Approved Rate of 
Return on common 
Equity 

Percentages 

15 



12 












91 



■92 



'89 '90 

Fiscal Year 

■ Centra Gas (Ending 12-31) 
Consumers Gas (Ending 9-30) 

■ Union Gas (Ending 3-3 J) 



Consumers Gas is Canada's largest natural gas distribution utility serving approx- 
imately 1,117,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers in south, central and east- 
ern Ontario. British Gas Holdings (Canada) Limited owns approximately 85 per cent of the 
common shares of Consumers Gas. The remaining 15 per cent is publicly owned following an 
offering of common shares to the public during the year. 

Union is the second-largest gas distributor in the province, serving customers in south- 
western Ontario. It also operates a network of pipeline, storage, and compression facilities for 
customers and other utilities in eastern Ontario, Quebec and the United States. In all, Union 
serves some 657,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers. Union is owned by 
Westcoast Energy Inc. 

Centra reaches approximately 150 communities in northern and eastern Ontario. 
The Centra system is composed of a series of lateral pipelines running off the TransCanada 
Pipelines system, starting at Kenora and extending to Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. 
Centra serves approximately 201,200 customers. It is also owned by Westcoast Energy Inc. 

NRG is a small utility serving some 2,600 customers in the Aylmer area. 

Ontario also has five small gas companies that are exempt from rate regulation under the 
OEB Act and two municipally-owned gas utilities that are not regulated by the Board. 
Reviewing Ontario Hydro Rates 

In 1974 the OEB's mandate was extended to include reviews of changes in Ontario Hydros 
bulk power rates. Ontario Hydro serves more than 3.71 million customers directly and indi- 
rectly; 86 per cent are residential. 

Hydros bulk power rates are set by the utility's board of directors. However, Ontario 
Hydro is required to submit any proposed change in its rates to the Minister of Environment 
and Energy, who then refers the proposal to the Board, along with full technical information 
and financial data. 

After a public hearing, which usually runs about four weeks, the Board submits its report 
with recommendations to the Minister. Our role is an advisory one and our recommendations 
are not binding on Ontario Hydro. 
References and Generic Hearings 

The Lieutenant Governor in Council, the Minister of Environment and Energy or the 
Minister of Natural Resources may refer a matter to the Board for a public hearing and report. 
These references normally concern energy-related matters of current interest and generally 
attract widespread public attention. The Board's reports are advisory in nature. The Board may 
also hold generic hearings on its own initiative on matters under its jurisdiction. 
Approval of Pipelines 

Utilities intending to construct a natural gas transmission line in Ontario must obtain 
Board approval. The Board assesses whether the construction is in the public interest, consider- 
ing safety, economic feasibility, community benefits, security of supply and environmental 
impact. 

All pipeline construction proposals are reviewed by the Ontario Pipeline Coordination 
Committee (OPCC) chaired by an OEB staff member. The OPCC is an interministerial com- 
mittee on the environmental and safety aspects of pipeline construction, with members from 



io 



the Ministries of Agriculture and Food, Environment and Energy, Consumer and Commercial 
Relations, Natural Resources, Culture, Tourism & Recreation, Municipal Affairs, and 
Transportation. Regional agencies are also represented as required. 

In reviewing applications, the OPCC works to prevent negative long-term environmental 
effects and to minimize the short-term impact during construction. With these objectives in 
mind, each proposal is scrutinized, alternative routes or sites considered, and issues resolved 
before a formal application for leave to construct is filed with the OEB. 

The OEB's environmental guidelines for locating, constructing, and operating pipelines in 
Ontario set out the Boards expectations. Originally drafted in the mid-'80s, these guidelines were 
under revision in 1992-93. The committee responsible for the revisions received input from util- 
ities, government and other interested parties. 

The proposed changes will extend the environmental guidelines to activities not previously 
covered, including the development of storage pools and the construction of compressor, valve 
and metering stations. There will be more emphasis on planning considerations in urban areas, 
since the original guidelines were designed with rural areas in mind. In addition, public partici- 
pation will be expanded through a more structured public input and review procedure to address 
concerns before a location or route is chosen. 
Approval of Franchise Agreements 

Each municipality may grant a gas utility the right to provide gas service and use road 
allowances or utility easements within its borders. The specific terms and conditions of the fran- 
chise agreement must be approved by the Board. Many of the existing agreements, in place for 
30 years or more, are expiring. A model franchise agreement was introduced in 1988 as the basis 
for all new and renewed agreements. 
Certificates of public Convenience and Necessity 

No person is allowed to construct any works to supply gas without Board approval. The 
approval, in the form of a certificate, is not given unless public convenience and necessity sup- 
port the extension of service. 
Approval of Storage Facilities 

The capacity to store gas is vital to the natural gas distribution system in Ontario. The main 
storage sites are depleted geological reservoir formations in southwestern Ontario. Supplies 
stored in these facilities are used to meet fluctuating demand and can be tapped in case of emer- 
gency. 

Gas is normally injected into storage during the summer months when demand is low and 
purchases are less costly, and withdrawn in high-consumption periods during the winter. 
Storage also enables Ontario distributors to balance their loads throughout the year and reduce 
their gas costs. This load balancing makes it possible for the pipeline system from Western 
Canada to operate efficiently. 

Gas may not be injected into any geological formation unless it is a designated gas storage 
area. The Board recommends to the Lieutenant Governor in Council areas that are suitable for 
designation, and may authorize their use, after approval by the Lieutenant Governor in Council. 
The Board also determines the compensation payable to the owners of land where the storage 
pools are situated, if the parties cannot reach agreement. 



The capacity to store gas 
is vital to the natural gas 
distribution system in 
Ontario. 



ii 



A Centra pipeline under 
construction in summer 1992 
to bring natural gas to the 
community ojBeardmore near 
Geraldton in northern Ontario. 



Applications for drilling permits for wells within a designated gas storage area must be 
referred to the Board by the Minister of Natural Resources, whose ministry issues the permits. 
The Boards recommendation in these cases is binding. 

The Board also regulates certain other aspects of drilling or operation of gas or oil wells. 
Changes of Utility Ownership 

Permission of the Lieutenant Governor in Council is required when a utility wishes to sell 
its assets or amalgamate with another utility. Approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council 
is also necessary when any person wishes to acquire shares of a utility that will result in owner- 
ship by that person of more than 20 per cent of any class of shares. The Lieutenant Governor 
in Council refers such changes in ownership of utilities to the Board for a hearing and report. 
Compliance with Undertakings 

As a condition of approval of a sale or amalgamation, the Lieutenant Governor in Council 
may require the utility to enter into specific undertakings, such as commitments to maintain 
financial integrity. 

Occasionally, a utility will request an exemption from an undertaking so it can proceed 
with a specific transaction. The Board determines whether a hearing is required, assesses the 
merits of the application and, if the application is approved, may attach conditions to the 
approval. 




12 



Board Structure and Resources 



REPORTING TO THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, 
THE OEB IS A REGULATORY AGENCY OF THE ONTARIO GOV- 
ERNMENT. The Board is subject to the administrative policies 
established by the government through management board 
of Cabinet. 



Legal authority 

Most of the OEB's responsibilities are established by the Ontario Energy Board Act. In addition, 
six other statutes give jurisdiction to the Board: the Municipal Franchises Act, the Petroleum Resources 
Act, the Public Utilities Act, the Assessment Act, the Toronto District Heating Corporation Act and the 
Intervenor Funding Project Act. 

The procedures of the Board, as an administrative tribunal, are governed by the Statutory Powers 
Procedure Act. The OEB also follows its own Draft Rules of Practice and Procedure. 
Reassessing the regulatory Framework 

The nature of public utilities changes along with the economic and social environment. This 
year the Board began a major review of the Ontario Energy Board Act, which has been in place for 
almost 30 years. 

A committee of Board members and staff was established to spearhead this task, with teams 
formed to review various sections of the Act. Based on these efforts, the Board will make recommen- 
dations to the Minister of Environment and Energy for updating the legislation. 

The OEB's Draft Rules of Practice and Procedure, which have shaped the hearing process for the 
past four years, are also being re-examined. In 1992-93 we began an in-depth review of these rules in 
the light of past experience and emerging needs. 

In addition, the Board is actively participating in a committee of the Society of Ontario 
Adjudicators and Regulators on revisions to the Statutory Powers Procedure Act. The committee plans 
to submit recommendations to the Attorney General. 
Human Resources 

The OEB is comprised of nine full-time members, including the Chair and Vice-Chair, plus two 
part-time members. The Board normally sits in three-member panels to hear cases. 

Board members are appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council for terms of up to three 
years, upon the recommendation of the Minister of Environment and Energy in consultation with the 
OEB Chair. The Board is a multi-disciplinary group, with economists, lawyers, engineers, accoun- 
tants and business people bringing diverse perspectives to its work. 

The OEB operated with an approved employee complement of 38 this year, in addition to the 
Board members. 

The Board has 13 technical staff, who take part in hearings. They are responsible for completing 
the public record, that is, ensuring the Board has enough evidence to make a decision. 

Technical staff also act in the public interest by recommending how the Board should resolve the 
issues examined during the proceeding. They develop several options balancing the interests of the 
parties, and usually indicate a preferred alternative. When not involved in a hearing, technical staff 



The OEB has begun a major 
review ojthe Ontario Energy 
Board Act, in place for almost 
30 years.. 



13 



are available to provide assistance to the Board on matters which are not the subject of a proceeding. 
All recommendations by technical staff are on the public record. 

The Board receives technical support and advice from two expert advisors. These advisors do not 
participate in the hearings, and are therefore available to assist the Board throughout the hearing and 
decision-making process. They also provide briefings on a number of subjects, such as industry trends, 
on a continuing basis. 

The Boards Energy Returns Officer (ERO) monitors the financial performance of the gas utilities 
on an ongoing and confidential basis. If a utility's earnings appear to be out of line with its allowed 
rate of return, the ERO may conduct a special investigation. The outcome could lead the Board to 
conduct a public review of a utility's earnings and, if necessary, it could lead to a change in rates. 

The Board Secretary is responsible for seeing that the logistics of hearings proceed smoothly 
and is the guardian of all official Board records. The Board Solicitor provides legal advice to Board 
members and staff and acts as the assessment officer in the cost awards process. The Administrative 
Support Group provides management services in the financial, human resources and facilities areas, 
as well as information systems support and office services. 



ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD 



director 

technical 

Operations 

E.A. Mills 



SENIOR 
PROJECT 

Manager 

A I \ Robi II: 

PROJECT 

Coordinator 
W.A Tsotoi 
AL Stein 

Assistant 

project 

coordinator 

M I Roth 
(Contract) 



SENIOR 

Project 
Manager 

/ ( ray ley 



PROJECT 

Coordinator 
A I Drago 
D Barrett 



ASSISTANT 

PROJECT 

COORDINATOR 

Vacant 



Chair 

M.C Rounding 



Vice Chair 

O.J. Cook 



SENIOR 

Project 
Manager 

i / ( haplin 



Project 

Manager 

Engineering 

i I Macfeii 



PROJECT 

Manager 

Enviromental 

N] McKay 



PROJECT 

Coordinator 
B.LHewson 



BOARD 
SECRETARY 

Vacant 



ASSISTANT 

BOARD 
SECRETARY 

PH.O'Dell 



hearings 
Assistant 

A. Lm iani 



RECORDS 
CLERK 

C.A. Parkes 



Secretary 
to the Chair 

/.£. Byrnes 



BOARD 

Members 

F i i l Time 
Mjl/Jl 

C W. \\ Darling 

r\\ i hopple 

1 I Ulan 

CL Cottlt 

E I Robertson 



KR Perdue 
J B Simon 



MANAGER 

OPERATIONAL 

PLANNING 

G Brown 



I 



SENIOR 

TECHNICAL 

ADVISOR 

D Matthews 



LIBRARIAN 

LEBuailli 



Technical 
Advisor 

R Piigh 



BOARD 
COUNSEL 

C. Simons 

BOARD 
SOLICITOR 

S McCann 
T. Baumhard 

'( i'niraci) 



ENERGY RETURNS 

OFFICER/DIRECTOR 

FINANCE & 

ADMINISTRATION 

R.A. Capvadocm 



deputy energy 
Returns officers 

\ M I 



Manager Finance & administration 

A.F Mcddows-Taylor 



financial 
Assistant 

S Lila 



OFFICE MANAGER 

PA. DrennCT 



SUPPORT SERVICES 



SECRETARIES 

E.P Irajfeov 
N.E Woodall 
M E Connor 

K A. John 
IV V 

C. Martin 



RECEPTIONIST 

ajond 



Finance & Admin 
clerk 
D.R Jess 



SYSTEMS GROUP 



senior systems 
Analyst 

C.B M 
Systems Analyst 
G. Mayer-Powell 



14 



Financial Report 

The Ontario Energy Board Act authorizes the Board to recover its costs by assessing the utilities 
involved in hearings and related activities. Following a hearing, the Board issues a cost order to the 
utility concerned. The amount to be paid to the Board includes out-of-pocket and direct expenses 
attributable to the specific hearing, as well as a contribution towards the Board's fixed costs, including 
overhead and payroll. 

In 1992-93 the Board introduced a policy of recovering 100 per cent of its costs from the utili- 
ties, an increase from 85 per cent recovered the previous year. This means the full cost of the Boards 
operations will be recouped in due course from cost orders to utilities, with no burden on the Ontario 
government. 

As the table shows, the Board underspent its printed estimates by $1,604,405 in 1992-93. There 
were two principal reasons for the underspending. First, government expenditure control measures 
accounted for $742,840 - including payroll constraints of $306,008 and a positive variance in the 
public hearings budget due to a less than expected volume of hearings. Second, efficiency measures 
such as alternative dispute resolution, a two-year test period and use of in-house counsel led to cost 
reductions of $861,565. 

OEB SPENDING ANALYSIS- 1992-93 



Standard Account 



Estimates 



Salaries & Wages $2,771,000 

Employee Benefits 503,400 

Transportation & Communications 306,800 
Services 2,173,500 

Supplies & Equipment 40 1 ,400 



TOTAL 



$6,156,100 



Actual 



$4,551,695 



Underspending 



$2,527,739 


$243,261 


440,653 


62,747 


170,259 


136,541 


1,256,345 


917,155 


156,699 


244,701 



$1,604,405 



The jull cost oj the Board's 
operations will be recouped 
from the utilities, with no burden 
on the Ontario government. 



15 



1992-93 HIGHLIGHTS 



Fostering Access and Participation 



In 1993 the Board introduced 
new policies and procedures foi 
cost awards 



since energy production and use have a wide impact, the 
Board's activities affect a variety of interest groups, 
intervenors in our proceedings range from consumer and 
environmental organizations to marketers, suppliers and 
landowners. 

Parties appearing before the Board in 1992-93 are listed in the "Public Participation" sec- 
tion at the back of this annual report. 

INTERVENOR FUNDING PROJECT ACT 

For many years participation in tribunal proceedings in Ontario was largely confined to 
profit-driven special-interest groups, who could afford to finance their involvement. To sup- 
port the participation of public-interest groups, the government introduced the Intervenor 
Funding Project Act, which took effect on April 1, 1989 as a three-year pilot project. 

The Act establishes a procedure to provide advance funding to intervenors before a number 
of boards, including the Ontario Energy Board. The funds are used to cover the costs of lawyers, 
expert consultants and administrative expenses. 

By making funds available before the hearing, the Act enables parties to intervene who would 
otherwise be financially unable to participate. As a result, not-for-profit, cause-driven representa- 
tion by environmental and consumer groups has become a regular occurrence before the OEB. 

Prior to the Intervenor Funding Project Act, the OEB and other boards had jurisdiction to 
award costs only at the conclusion of a proceeding. This power remains in force. Any intervenor 
funds provided before a proceeding are, of course, deducted from the amount payable at the end. 

The Board holds a special hearing for each proceeding to rule on applications for advance inter- 
venor funding. The Board considers the relevance of the issues the group intends to raise at the 
hearing, as well as the groups ability to finance itself and represent the public interest. The funding 
hearing is held before a single Board member who is not involved in the actual proceeding. 

Under the Act this year the Board awarded $740,110 to 22 intervenors, including 
Pollution Probe, Energy Probe, the Consumers Association of Canada (Ontario) and the 
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty among others. 

With the scheduled sunset date approaching, the government decided to continue the 
intervenor-funding legislation for an additional four years. The new expiry date is April 1, 
1996. During this period the government will be considering amendments that have been pro- 
posed to the legislation. 
New Cost Award Practices 

As mentioned, the OEB also has authority to award costs to the intervenors at the conclu- 
sion of a proceeding. In January 1993 the Board introduced new policies and procedures for 
cost awards. 

Under the new approach, at the end of a proceeding, the Board determines the percentage 
of each intervenors expenses to be reimbursed. Intervenors have an opportunity to receive 100 
per cent of their reasonably incurred costs, provided that in the Board's opinion they participate 



16 



responsibly and contribute to the Boards understanding of the issues. Under the old system, 
intervenors usually received only 70 to 85 per cent of their costs. 

Interveners submit cost statements in accordance with the OEBs cost assessment guide- 
lines, within two weeks of applying for an award. The cost statements are reviewed for reason- 
ableness by the Board assessment officer, who makes a recommendation on the exact amount to 
be reimbursed. The Board makes the final award. 

The accelerated timetable for filing cost statements, coupled with the improvements in the 
Boards processing of awards, means intervenors receive their funds much more quickly. By year- 
end the Board had cut the average time from hearing to cost order by eight weeks. 

During the 1992-93 fiscal year, the Board issued 52 intervenor cost orders at the conclusion 
of 12 proceedings. The amounts awarded totalled $1,281,333. Several cost award applications 
were under review and remained outstanding at the close of the fiscal year. 
Outreach 

Better communications with our client groups ranked as a priority this year. 

Senior staff of the Board continued to meet regularly with representatives of the Ontario 
Natural Gas Association (ONGA), which includes the three major gas utilities. The focus of this 
committee has been on improving the cost-effectiveness of the regulatory process. 

To keep utilities, intervenors and interested groups up to date on the progress of rate appli- 
cations and other Board cases and activities, we launched the Regulatory Agenda newsletter. This 
year nine issues were published reaching a circulation of 48 interested parties. 

We also embarked on a project to rewrite all our forms in plain language, and we began 
including executive summaries as part of Board decisions for the convenience of readers. 

Advance Intervenor Funding Awards - 1992-93 



Case File 
Type Number 


Proponent 
Applicant 


Number of 
Applications 


Number of 
Successful 
Applications 


Amounts 
Requested 


Amounts 
Awarded 


Natural Gas Rates 


Applications 










EBRO 476 


Union 


3 


2 


$ 98,819 


$50,867 


EBRO 479 


Consumers Gas 


3 


1 


$183,029 


$22,779 


Rate Reference from the Minister of Energy 








HR 21 


Ontario Hydro 


7 


7 


$534,341 


$298,477 


Generic Hearing on Gas Integrated Resource Planning 








EBO 169-11 


Consumers Gas 

Union 

Centra 


7 


6 


$260,551 


$158,386 


EBO 169-III 


Consumers Gas 

Union 

Centra 


6 


5 


$217,660 


$159,549 


Pipeline Construction and Expropriations 










EBLO 244 


Union 


1 


1 


$106,483 


$50,052 


TOTALS 




27 


22 


$1,400,882 


$740,110 



17 



Improving Procedures 



The Board encourages settlement 
processes to reduce the length 
and complexity oj hearings. 



THROUGH CONSULTATION AND COOPERATIVE EFFORT WITH THE 
UTILITIES AND OTHER PARTIES, THE BOARD HAS BEEN TESTING 
NEW PROCEDURES THAT HOLD THE POTENTIAL TO MAKE THE HEAR- 
ING PROCESS MORE EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE. 

As noted, the Board maintains an ongoing committee with the Ontario Natural Gas 
Association (ONGA), which represents the three major utilities. Through consultation with 
this OEB/ONGA forum, the Board has introduced a number of innovative measures to smooth 
the regulatory process. These initiatives include alternative dispute resolution (ADR), two-year 
test periods and undertaking-compliance guidelines. 

Proposals to improve regulatory efficiency are initiated by the Board, its staff or the utility 
representatives. Final Board approval is required for a proposal to be accepted as standard 
operating procedure at the OEB. 
Settlement Processes/Alternative Dispute Resolution 

The Board this year continued to encourage settlement processes or alternative dispute 
resolution to reduce the length and complexity of hearings. 

Our hearing on the demand-side aspects of gas integrated resource planning illustrates the 
ADR settlement concept. To facilitate the proceedings, we held two technical conferences to clarify 
the issues and consolidate the positions of the parties. 

At the first meeting the parties stated their positions and discussed the issues. Board tech- 
nical staff then prepared preliminary consensus positions combining the parties' views and cir- 
culated the document for comments. These consensus positions were finalized through 
further consultation at the second technical conference. This process led to a more focused 
examination of the issues at the formal proceeding. 

An ADR or settlement process was also implemented in the Consumers Gas main rates 
application for fiscal 1993 and the Union main rates application for fiscal 1993 and 1994. In all 
these cases, the Board arranged ADR meetings prior to the formal proceedings to foster consen- 
sus on as many issues as possible. At these informal meetings, settlement agreements were 
reached by such diverse parties as the Consumers' Association of Canada (Ontario), Pollution 
Probe, Energy Probe, the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty, the Industrial Gas Users 
Association and the utilities. 

The Board found the outcome of ADR encouraging, as it appeared that expensive hearing 
time had been saved. However, we stressed that negotiation cannot supplant Board decision- 
making. Under legislation, the Board's findings must be based on its own assessment of the evi- 
dence. The fact that parties have reached settlement positions is not in itself sufficient grounds 
for the Board to endorse these positions. 
Two-year Test Period 

Traditionally, the Board sets rates one year at a time. In 1992-93 we continued to experi- 
ment with ways of streamlining the regulatory process by setting rates for one year on an inter- 
im basis and finalizing those rates at the same time as the rates for the following year. The 
objective is to save some of the time and resources expended in two full rate proceedings. 



18 



This modified two-year test period was adopted in the latest Union Gas main rates applica- 
tion, which covered both fiscal 1993 and fiscal 1994. The Board established interim rates for 
1993 in a limited proceeding and held a second hearing a year later to finalize rates for both 
1993 and 1994. 
Guidelines on Undertaking Compliance 

Each utility and its associated parent company have agreed with the Lieutenant Governor in 
Council to follow certain general operational guidelines. Utilities occasionally seek exemptions 
from these undertakings. For example, a company might need an exemption to accept a tender 
from an affiliate or to invest in a non-regulated activity. 

This year, the Board introduced guidelines on undertaking compliance to create a better 
understanding of what is expected in this area and to provide for a review of relevant transac- 
tions. The Board will also review certain of these transactions to determine whether an on-going 
exemption should be approved and whether conditions should apply. On-going conditional 
approvals will enable the Board to reduce the cost of processing specific transactions, and permit 
the utilities to engage in approved activities on a more timely basis. 
Other Reforms 

We are revamping our system for monitoring the financial performance of gas utilities, and 
have made significant progress with this initiative during the year. Under the new system com- 
panies will report less, but more relevant, information to our Energy Returns Officer. More 
emphasis will be placed on the projected financial outlook, to augment year-to-date results. 

In addition, we moved ahead with the first major reform since the mid-'60s of the uniform 
system of accounts, used by gas utilities to present their financial information. The series of 
accounting classifications prescribed by the Board needs an overhaul to reflect changes in 
accounting practice, income tax rules and the structure of the industry. 

In the mid-80s the Board developed an economic feasibility test to determine if utility sys- 
tem extensions - such as pipeline projects - were economically viable. This year Board staff con- 
sulted with various groups to fine-tune the specific methodologies employed. 
Recommendations will be presented to the Board in 1993-94. 



The Public 
Hearing Process 



initiation 

»■ by application for rate increase or other 

approval 
- by reference from Lieutenant Govemoi 

in Council or Minister 

* on Board's own motion. 

NOTICE OF APPLICATION 

»• to all interested parties and/or by publi- 
cation. 

Intervention 

> notice of intent and reasons for participa- 
tion in hearing by parties, known as 
intervenors. 

PRE-HEARING documenta- 
tion 

* evidence filed by applicant prior to 
hearing 

*■ Board staff and mtervenors can request 
more information and file their own evi- 
dence. 

Intervenor Funding 
Hearing 

> bearing on applications for advance 
funding by intervenors 

Pr-Hearing meetings 

> technical conferences to clarify the evi- 
dence 

" issues meeting to determine the issues 
to be covered 

> settlement conferences to negotiate 
issues prior to hearing. 

Hearing of Evidence 

> witness panels presented by applicant, 
Board staff or intenenors 

> cross-examination by utility, Board staff 
or intervenors 

> written and oral argument by each party. 

board Decision/report 

> summarizes issues and arguments 

* makes findings or recommendations. 

Board Order 

* binding direction to implement Board 
decision. 



19 



Administrative Justice Community 



THE ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD IS ONE OF 84 REGULATORY 
AND ADJUDICATIVE BODIES IN ONTARIO. WE ARE ACTIVE IN 
THE ADMINISTRATIVE-TRIBUNAL COMMUNITY PROVI NCI ALLY, 
NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY. 

ONTARIO ACTIVITIES 

In 1992-93 the Ontario government began an agency program review, part of a broader effort to 
review the efficiency and effectiveness of all government programs. The first stage of this review of 
agencies, boards and commissions was overseen by a steering committee, which created five task 
forces. The OEB was pleased to make a contribution to the review through participation on the various 
task forces. 

The results were presented to Management Board, and initial recommendations for restructuring 
the agency system have been approved in principle by Cabinet. The next stage of the review and pro- 
posals for implementation will begin in the 1993-94 fiscal year. 

The OEB participates in the Society of Ontario Adjudicators and Regulators (SOAR), which 
includes agency chairs, members and executive staff. The OEB Chair is Secretary of SOARs Circle of 
Chairs section. In addition, OEB staff helped organize the annual Conference of Ontario Boards and 
Agencies, held in the fall of 1992. 
National Scene 

At the national level, we are involved in the Canadian Association of Members of Public Utility 
Tribunals (CAMPUT), comprised of members of federal and provincial public utility tribunals, mainly 
in the energy and telecommunications fields. The OEB Chair is chair of CAMPUTs Energy Committee 
and a member of the Executive Committee. 

The OEB Chair is also serving as co-chair of the 1993 conference of the Canadian Council of 
Administrative Tribunals (CCAT), an organization of federal, provincial and territorial agencies, boards 
and commissions. 
International Links 

The Ontario Energy Board has observer status on the National Association of 
Regulatory Utility Commissioners in the United States (NARUC). A number of Board 
members and staff participate in various NARUC committees and subcommittees. 



20 



Streamlining Operations 



The OEB is moving towards the "paperless hearing" through an electronic data interchange 
project. This is a multi-year effort to: 

♦ automate hearing rooms through such steps as on-line viewing of evidence; 

♦ enable electronic communication between the Board and the parties to a hearing - including 
electronic mail and electronic filing of evidence; and 

♦ provide on-line access to key Board documents and information for utilities, intervenors and 
the public. 

The goal is to make the hearing process more efficient, and also to preserve the environ- 
ment by reducing the need for paper. 

Heading in this direction in 1992-93, we continued to implement a major computerized 
full-text storage and retrieval system. As part of the system, we are building a textbase of infor- 
mation from OEB decisions, reports, transcripts and other official documents. During the year 
we completed an inventory of core documents to be translated to the new electronic format. 

When operational, this public database will facilitate research by industry, intervenors and 
Board staff. Users will be able to do sophisticated "concept" searches as well as the simpler word 
searches now possible. 




The world's first triple compressor unit 
powered by a single jet engine was 
commissioned this year at the Union Gas 
Dawn operations site. 



21 



Regulatory Agenda 



l^jfl / 








m 







An exhibit mounted by Ontario Hydro at 
the Metro Toronto Convention Centre 
encourages visitors to "Be a Power Saver". 



Gas Integrated Resource Planning Examined 

Jurisdictions across North America are searching for ways to reconcile the need for energy 
with the economic cost and environmental impact of energy production and use. Integrated 
Resource Planning (1RP) is an emerging potential solution. 

Traditionally, growing energy needs have been met simply by expanding the supply sys- 
tem - in the case of natural gas, by drilling more wells, developing more storage areas and 
building more pipelines. 1RP, however, involves a broader perspective. It calls for meeting the 
expected demand for energy services from the least costly mix of demand-side as well as sup- 
ply-side measures. Demand-side measures (DSM) include energy efficiency through the use of 
high-efficiency furnaces and appliances, for example, and load management to reduce con- 
sumption at expensive peak periods. 

In the IRP concept, the planning process integrates demand-side and supply-side 
resources. The principal goal is to achieve the lowest-cost energy option for the utility and the 
consumer while recognizing environmental issues. 

The OEB issued a discussion paper on integrated resource planning for natural gas utili- 
ties in September 1991, and intervenors including the three main gas utilities and consumer, 
environmental and aboriginal groups filed submissions. After consulting with the parties, the 
Board decided to take a building-block approach to IRP Demand-side management issues 
were investigated first. Later the Board will move on to supply-side issues and then the inte- 
gration of all aspects of IRP. 

Two technical conferences on DSM issues - in August and September 1992 - offered a 
forum to share information and develop consensus positions among the parties. An oral hear- 
ing on DSM issues ran from November 9 to December 4, 1992 and the Board was deliberating 
as the fiscal year ended. The Boards aim is to provide guidelines to assist Ontario gas utilities 
as they set about instituting formal DSM programs. 
Generic hearing: EBO 169, 169-11, 169-111 

Hydro's Bulk Power Rates Reviewed 

In April 1992 the Minister of Energy referred Ontario Hydro's bulk power rate proposal to the 
OEB. Hydro proposed an average rate increase effective January 1, 1993, of 8.6 per cent to meet a 
forecast revenue requirement of $9,017 million, which represented an increase of $796 million over 
the 1992 budget. The proposed 8.6 per cent rate increase was expected to generate a net income of 
$318 million, which was $254 million short of Hydros statutory debt retirement level of $572 mil- 
lion. 

In June 1992 Hydro filed its final updated evidence, which identified a revenue requirement of 
$8,936 million, and a drop in expected net income from $318 million to $269 million for fiscal 1993. 
Based on the updated financial oudook, Hydro would require a rate increase of 14.5 per cent to 
obtain the target net income of $759 million it had set for 1993, a 12.4 per cent rate increase to gener- 
ate sufficient income to meet its statutory debt retirement level, and a 9.2 per cent rate increase to 
maintain its net income at $318 million as originally proposed. 

The Boards report, issued in August 1992, contained 18 recommendations, seven of which con- 
cerned Hydros revenue requirement. The Board recommended that Hydro hold its rate increase at 



22 



7.9 per cent - mainly through changes to its long-term interest-rate forecast, revising the forecast for in- 
service dates of the new Darlington facilities, and a reduction in Hydros operating and maintenance 
budget. 

The Boards recommendations would produce a net income of $420 million. In combination with a 
$140 million withdrawal from Hydros reserve for stabilization of rates and contingencies, this net income 
figure would meet the adjusted statutory debt retirement level of $560 million. 

The Board made a further 1 1 recommendations regarding Hydro's operations. 

One recommendation was that in the next reference (HR 22) the Minister include a direction for 
the Board to review the cost-effectiveness of the programs in Hydros overall energy management plan. 
This plan supports demand-side measures including energy conservation and energy efficiency. 

The Board stated that Hydro should make resources available for the evaluation and monitoring of 
energy management programs. We also called on Hydro to increase its fuel substitution program efforts - 
to encourage electricity customers to switch to cheaper fuels - as much as possible. 

With respect to non-utility generation, that is, power production by privately-owned facilities, the 
Board recommended that Hydro establish a set of goals to foster small environmentally friendly and 
socially preferred projects. Hydro should no longer provide financial assistance for the development of 
other non-utility generation projects during this period of overcapacity. 

The Board further recommended that the Minister introduce changes to section 24 of the Power 
Corporation Act to ensure that its pension fund provisions are consistent with the Pension Benefits Act, 
in particular with regard to the constraints on Hydros use of any surplus in its pension fund. The 
Board also recommended that Hydro should strive to achieve real and permanent reductions in its 
operating and maintenance program costs. 

In addition, we called on Hydro to reduce its total compensation levels and bring them more in 
line with levels paid at other comparable corporations. The Boards review of executive compensation 
matters concluded that the compensation for the top executives at Hydro was not excessive, and that 
the salaries of the Chair and President were below those of the comparison groups examined. 
HR21 



Ontario Hydro's Darlington 
nuclear generating station. 




23 




Consumers Gas has produced a 
home energy management guide 
and video to help consumers use 
energy more efficiently. 



Natural Gas Rates Hearings 
Consumers Gas interim rates 

Consumers Gas applied to the Board in June 1992 to vary the EBRO 473 Order, which 
established final rates for the Consumers Gas fiscal year ending September 30, 1992. 
Consumers Gas requested the vary order to reflect an agreement with its major Canadian gas 
supplier, Western Gas Marketing Limited, to decrease the price of long-term gas supplies from 
$1.91 to $1.70 per gigajoule for the period from July 1, 1992 to November 1, 1993. 

This agreement was expected to yield total gas savings for the 1992 fiscal year of approxi- 
mately $15 million. A condition precedent to the agreement was that the lower gas price was 
to be reflected in the calculation of the reference price at which Consumers Gas purchases gas 
under buy/sell arrangements. 

The Board approved the gas-cost consequences of the agreement. 
EBRO 473-A (Oral Decision August 21, 1992 - Written Reasons for Decision November 12, 1992). 

Consumers Gas Main Rates 

Consumers Gas applied to the Board in March 1992 for a rate increase for the 1993 fiscal 
year, beginning October 1, 1992. The financial data supporting the request is outlined in the 
following summary table. 

One element of the application was a request for the Board to approve the gas-cost conse- 
quences of the second part of an agreement with Western Gas Marketing Limited (WGML) to 
restructure the existing long-term supply contract with Consumers Gas. The restructured con- 
tract provided for a decrease in the average price of gas from $1.70 to $1.59 per gigajoule effec- 
tive November 1, 1992. 

The Board declared the Consumers Gas rates to be interim effective October 1, 1992. In a 
partial decision with reasons, the Board rejected the gas-cost consequences of the restructured 
contract agreement. The Board concluded that the proposed changes would significantly con- 
travene rate-making principles and could lead to undesirable long-term consequences. The 
Board found that the $1.70 per gigajoule was a reasonable price for WGML supplies in the 
1993 fiscal year, in accordance with the original long-term contract between the parties. 

Consumers Gas; Summary of Financial Data Fiscal 1993 

Requested Allowed 



Million 



Rate Base 

Utility Income 

Gross Revenue Deficiency 



2078.7 

202.4 

58.9 



2069.5 

210.1 

26.0 



Percentage 



Indicated Rate of Return 9.74 

Required Rate of Return 1 1 .34 

Common Equity Ratio 35.51 

Rate of Return on Common Equity 13.375 



10.15 
10.86 
35.00 
12.30 



EBRO 479 (Partial Decision with Reasons Novcmbei- 1 2, 1 992 - Finn! Decision with Reasons March 3, 1 993). 



24 



Centra main Rates 

In July 1991 Centra submitted an application to the Board requesting an increase in rates 
for the 1992 fiscal year (beginning January 1), based on a revenue deficiency of $32.5 million. 
After the original filing, Centra renegotiated a gas price of $1.98 per gigajoule with Western Gas 
Marketing Limited, and amended its evidence to reflect this lower gas price and other changes to 
its capital structure and rate of return. 

The financial highlights of the Boards decision appear in the chart below. The Board also 
approved the gas-cost consequences of the renegotiated gas price of $1.98 per gigajoule. 

Centra: Summary of financial Data Fiscal 1992 



Requested 



Million 



Allowed 



Rate Base 




512.0 


Utility Income 




52.1 


Gross Revenue Deficiency 




19.9 


Indicated Rate of Return 




10.18 


Required Rate of Return 




12.38 


Common Equity Ratio 




38.00 


Rate of Return on Common 


Equity 


14.50 



511.4 
52.6 
14.0 



Percentage 



10.29 
11.84 
36.00 
13.50 



EBRO 474 (Decision April 22, 1992). 

Centra Interim Rates 

Centra filed an amended notice of motion in October 1992 for Board approval of the gas- 
cost consequences of an agreement with Western Gas Marketing Limited (WGML) for the peri- 
od commencing November 1, 1992. The agreement provided for a restructuring of the existing 
contract for long-term gas supply and a decrease in the average commodity cost to $1.57 per 
gigajoule, while including a $0.20 per gigajoule charge for the reservation of long-term supply 
for two thirds of the contracted volume. If the Board did not approve the restructured agree- 
ment, the long-term gas supply would be at a fallback price of $1.98 per gigajoule. 

In its interim decision the Board rejected the gas costs arising from the proposed restructur- 
ing, as the changes would alter the current rate structure and would be contrary to current rate- 
making principles. Furthermore, the Board refused to allow into rates the gas-cost 
consequences flowing from the fallback price of $1.98 per gigajoule. 

The Board stated that it expected Centra to reopen negotiations with WGML at the earliest 
opportunity, and to file an amendment to the motion incorporating the results of the negotia- 
tions. Pending the filing of the amendment, the Board declared that the existing interim gas 
rates would continue. 

In March 1993 Centra filed an amendment incorporating the results of the negotiations. 
The Board had not heard the case as of the end of the OEB fiscal year. 
EBR0474-A (Interim Decision January 11, 1993). 




A Centra employee inspects a 
natural gas forced-air furnace. 



25 



Cardinal Power Special Rates 

In February 1992 Cardinal Power filed a series of applications (EBLO 242 et al.) for 
authority to construct a pipeline bypassing Centra's gas distribution network, and running 
from the TransCanada PipeLines system to the proposed Cardinal cogeneration plant. The 
plant would use natural gas as a fuel to produce both electricity and steam. 

Prior to the hearing of these applications, Cardinal reached an agreement with Centra for a 
bypass-competitive rate, with the understanding that Centra would therefore construct and oper- 
ate the pipeline if the Board approved the negotiated rate. Cardinal then requested that its earlier 
applications be held in abeyance, and in August 1992 filed an amended application for the Board's 
approval of a bypass-competitive rate on Centra's system of $4.80 per thousand cubic metres. 

The hearing was held in February 1993 with the Board's decision outstanding at year end. 
EBRO 477. 

Union Gas Main Rates 

In September 1991 Union submitted an application to the Board for the purpose of setting 
rates for the sale, distribution, transmission and storage of gas for the 1993 and 1994 fiscal 
years. The Board heard evidence and established interim rates for Union's 1993 fiscal year com- 
mencing April 1, 1992. A second hearing was planned to finalize rates for both fiscal years in 
early 1993. 

In October 1992 Union filed evidence supporting its fiscal 1994 rate proposal, in addition 
to updated fiscal 1993 evidence. Union proposed to keep its final 1993 rates at the interim lev- 
els, and to rebate the resulting forecast revenue sufficiency of $2,332 million to customers. 

Union's evidence for fiscal year 1994 indicated a revenue deficiency of $32,899 million. 
The company asked for a return on equity of 13.75 per cent, an equity component of 29 per 
cent and a proposed rate base of $1,814 billion. 

The second hearing was held in February 1993 but the Board's decision had not been 
issued by the close of the OEB fiscal year. 
EBRO 476. 

Union Gas Interim rates 

In June 1992 Union filed a notice of motion for Board approval, on an interim basis, ol the 
gas-cost consequences of a renegotiation and restructuring of some of its gas supply contracts. 
Union had negotiated a reduction in the price under its contract with Western Gas Marketing 
Limited from $1.92 to $1.70 per gigajoule, and had also negotiated price reductions in seven of 
its other long-term gas supply contracts. The estimated impact of the price reductions in the 
period from July 1, 1992 to April 1, 1993 was approximately $45 million. 

The Board approved the gas-cost consequences of the renegotiated arrangements, with 
new gas sales rates effective September 1, 1992. 
EBRO 476-02 (Oral Decision July 31, 1992 - Written Reasons September 11, 1992). 



26 



Union Gas and Dow Chemical Canada Joint Venture 
-Special Rates 

Union Gas and Dow Chemical formed a joint venture in early 1991 for the purpose of 
developing and operating the Dow Block "A" Storage Pool in Sarnia. In March 1992 Union and 
Dow applied together for an order setting the storage rate to be charged for use of the facility. 
The sole customer of the storage pool for the period in question was to be Union Gas. 

In its decision, the Board reduced the rate base and operating expenses from the request, 
and held that the joint venture's return on common equity should be 0.75 per cent less than 
Unions return on common equity. At the time of the decision Unions return on common equity 
was 13.5 per cent on an interim basis, resulting in a return on common equity for the joint ven- 
ture of 12.75 percent. 

The Board approved an overall rate of return on rate base of 1 1.45 per cent and an overall 
revenue requirement of $3,938 million for the period from July 15, 1992 to March 31, 1993. 
The Board further decided that the rate for the joint venture should remain interim until the 
Board had rendered its final decision on Union's fiscal 1993 rate of return, and until Unions rate 
for the delivery of gas to the joint venture had been finalized. 
EBRO 478 (Decision November 12, 1992). 



Pipeline Applications 

Consumers Gas - Metro West Reinforcement 

Consumers Gas applied to the Board in late 1991 for leave to construct a transmission line 
from the City of Mississauga to a pressure-reduction station to be built at Widdicombe Hill 
Boulevard in the City of Etobicoke. Consumers Gas also applied for leave to construct another 
transmission line continuing from the new pressure-reduction station to St. Clair West and 
Nairn Avenue, including a connection to the utility's existing high-pressure distribution system 
at Martin Grove Road and Eglinton Avenue West. 




Consumers Gas completed 
the Metro West Reinforcement 
project in 1992. 



27 



The whole project, described as the Metro West reinforcement, was considered necessary 
to maintain pressure on the distribution system in the central Toronto area, while increasing 
capacity and the security of supply. 

At the hearing Consumers Gas amended its application by relocating the proposed pres- 
sure-reduction station, which shortened the required transmission line. The Board approved 
the amended application, granting Consumers Gas permission to construct the proposed facili- 
ties subject to conditions of approval. 
EBL024] (Decision June 16, 1992). 

Union - Bright to Owen Sound Pipeline 

In September 1991 Union applied for the Board's approval to construct additional pipeline 
capacity from the existing Bright compressor station to the Owen Sound line valve site on the 
Dawn-Trafalgar transmission system. The project was delayed until summer 1993 to allow for 
the execution of transportation contracts on the transmission system. 

The primary purpose of the new section of pipeline is to provide capacity for forecast con- 
tractual transportation commitments on the Dawn-Trafalgar system, and to meet increased 
demand from customers within Unions franchise area. The Board heard the application in March 
1993 and a decision was pending at year end. 
EBLO240. 

Union - bickford-Dawn Pipeline 

Union applied to the OEB in June 1992 for authorization to construct a pipeline linking the 
compressor station at the Bickford storage pool to the Dawn compressor station. Union also 
applied to build several short gathering pipelines within the boundaries of the storage pool. In 
addition, Union sought a favourable report from the Board to the Minister of Natural Resources 
with respect to permits to drill six new injection/withdrawal wells within the Bickford pool. 

The overall objective of the proposed facilities was to enhance the deliverability of the 
Bickford pool. This would enable Union to reduce its inventory and related carrying costs over 
the summer, in turn providing savings to customers. 

The Board held a hearing in London, Ontario in January 1993. The decision was pending at 
the end of the OEB's fiscal year. 
EBL0244/EBRM 104. 

Other Reports 

Consumers Gas Amalgamation with Tecumseh 

In February 1992 Consumers Gas filed an application with the Board seeking the pennission 
of the Lieutenant Governor in Council for Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited to sell, lease, convey or 
dispose of its entire gas transmission and storage system to Consumers Gas. Consumers Gas and 
Tecumseh also made a joint application for permission to amalgamate their storage operations. 

The Board recommended that the Lieutenant Governor in Council approve the Consumers 
Gas and Tecumseh applications. The Board noted that the OEB and the Lieutenant Governor in 
Council had already determined that Consumers Gas' operating control of Tecumseh would not 



28 



adversely affect the public interest. Therefore, the Board found that the merger would not have any 
adverse effects on the public interest. The Board stated that any impacts on ratepayers would be 
dealt with in the next Consumers Gas rates case. 

The Lieutenant Governor in Council granted both applications. As of September 30, 1992, 
the assets and operations of Tecumseh were amalgamated into Consumers Gas. 
EBO 173 (June 9, 1992). 

Assignment of Board Authority by Tecumseh to 
Consumers Gas 

Tecumseh and Consumers Gas made a further application to the Board in August 1992, seek- 
ing permission to assign to Consumers Gas all authority previously granted to Tecumseh by the 
Board. As part of the amalgamation, it was necessary to transfer any authorizations to inject, store, 
and remove gas from three designated gas storage areas to Consumers Gas. 

The Board ordered that parties to the proceeding could make written submissions regarding 
the application. The Boards decision in this matter was pending at year end. 
EBO 176. 

Union - edys mills Pool 

In March 1992 Union filed a series of applications seeking several approvals from the Board for the 
designation and operation of the Edys Mills Pool as a gas storage area. Union also requested the Board's 
authorization to construct a transmission line and a gathering line system. In June 1992 the Board 
received a reference from the Minister of Natural Resources to review a concurrent application by Union 
for permits to drill three wells into the Edys Mills Pool as part of the gas storage development 
project. 

Once fully developed, the storage pool will provide 58,500 thousand-cubic-metres of working 
capacity. Union stated that the proposed storage facilities were necessary to meet increased storage 
requirements in fiscal 1994, as well as to provide additional security of supply. 

After a hearing in Sarnia, the Board made a favourable recommendation to the Lieutenant 
Governor in Council and the pool was designated as a gas storage area by Ontario regulation 719/93. 
The Board also recommended that the Minister of Natural Resources issue the drilling permits. 

The Board reopened the hearing in December 1992 to hear evidence from Union regarding an 
apparent failure to apply for a permit from the County of Lambton prior to clearing land for the 
compressor station. The Board further directed Union to confirm by letter whether all other 
aspects of Union's evidence had been complied with. Union subsequently provided such a letter. 

In February 1993 the Board issued an order granting Union authorization to inject and leave 
to construct. 
EBO 1 74/EBLO 243/EBRM J 03. 




During the year Union developed the 
Edys Mills gas storage pool. 



29 



List of Proceedings 



The following is a tabular listing of all proceedings arising from applications and references 
received or initiated by the Board during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1993. Also listed are 
proceedings arising in earlier years and dealt with by the Board in the 1992-93 fiscal year. 



CASE 


FILE 






TYPE 


NUMBER 


APPLICANT 


CASE DESCRIPTION 


Natural Gas Rates Application 




EBRO 


473-A 


Consumers Gas 


Interim Rates Application 


EBRO 


474 


Centra 


Main Rates Application - Fiscal 1992 


EBRO 


474-A 


Centra 


Interim Rates Application 


EBRO 


476 


Union 


Main Rates Application - Fiscal 1993/1994 


EBRO 


476-02 


Union 


Interim Rates Application 


EBRO 


477 


Cardinal Power 


Special Rates Application 


EBRO 


478 


Union 


Union and Dow Chemical Canada Joint Venture - 
Special Rates Application 


EBRO 


479 


Consumers Gas 


Main Rates Application - Fiscal 1993 


Reference from the Minister 


of Energy regarding Ontario Hydro 


HR 


21 


Ontario Hydro 


Bulk Power Rates Fiscal Year 1993 


Pipeline 


Construction 






EBLO 


240 


Union 


Bright to Owen Sound Pipeline 


EBLO 


241 


Consumers Gas 


Metro West Reinforcement 


EBLO 


244 


Union 


Bickford - Dawn Pipeline 


Generic 


Hearing 






EBO 16? 


), 169-11, 169-111 


Ontario Energy Board 


Gas Integrated Resource Planning 



Other Reports 

EBO 173 Consumers Gas 

EBO 174/EBLO 243/EBRM 103 Union 
EBO 176 Tecumseh 



Amalgamation with Tecumseh 

Edys Mills Storage Pool 

Assignment of Board Authority to Consumers Gas 



New Franchises and Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity 



EBA 660/EBC 201 


Centra 


Township of Atwood 


EBA 661/EBC 202 


Centra 


Township of Dilke 


EBA 662/EBC 203 


Centra 


Township of LaVallee 


EBA 


663 


Centra 


Township of Neebring 


EBA 


664 


Centra 


Township of Shuniah 


Franchise Renewals 






EBA 


447 amended 


Centra 


Township of Alberton 


EBA 


629 


Centra 


Village of Frankford 


EBA 


630 


Union 


Village of Chatsworth 


EBA 


631 


Union 


Township of Egremont 


EBA 


632 


Union 


Township of Maryborough 


EBA 


633 


Union 


Township of Minto 


EBA 


634 


Union 


Township of Peel 


EBA 


635 


Union 


Township of Zorra 


EBA 


636 


Union 


Town of Hanover 


EBA 


637 


Union 


Town of Mount Forest 


EBA 


638 


Union 


Town of Palmerston 



30 



CASE 


FILE 






TYPE 


NUMBER 


APPLICANT 


CASE DESCRIPTION 


Franchise Renewals (cont'd) 






EBA 


639 


Union 


County of Middlesex 


EBA 


640 


Union 


Village of Arthur 


EBA 


641 


Union 


Town of Harriston 


EBA 


642 


Union 


County of Brant 


EBA 


643 


Union 


County of Perth 


EBA 


644 


Union 


Town of Durham 


EBA 


645 


Union 


Township of Arthur 


EBA 


646 


Union 


Village of Drayton 


EBA 


647 


Union 


City of Windsor 


EBA 


648 


Union 


Township of Sydenham 


EBA 


649 


Union 


Township of Normanby 


EBA 


650 


Union 


County of Grey 


EBA 


651 


Union 


Township of Sullivan 


EBA 


652 


Union 


Township of Bentinck 


EBA 


653 


Union 


Township of Holland 


EBA 


654 


Union 


Township of Wilmot 


EBA 


655 


Union 


Town of Listowel 


EBA 


656 


Union 


Township of Southwold 


EBA 


657 


Union 


Town of West Luther 


EBA 


658 


Union 


Township of Metcalfe 


EBA 


659 


Union 


Township of Wallace 



Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity 
EBC 111/119 Reopened Natural Resource Gas 
EBC 151 amended Centra 

EBC 200 Centra 



Township of Southwest Oxford 
Township of Alberton 
Village of Frankford 



Pipeline 


Exemptions 






PL 


80 


Consumers Gas 


Dixie South Station 


Uniform 


Accounting Orders 






UA 


89 


Consumers Gas 


Tax Savings Deferral Account 


UA 


90 


Centra 


Deferral Account of IRP intervention costs 


Approvals under Current Undertakings 




EBRLG 


28-D 


Union 


Gas Tendering Procedures 


EBRLG 


28-E WITHDRAWN 


Union 


Westcoast Energy Inc. 


EBRLG 


034-03 


Centra 


Employee Loan - $25,000 


EBRLG 


034-04 


Centra 


Employee Loan - $20,000 


EBRLG 


034-05 


Centra 


Employee Loan - $25,000 


EBRLG 


034-06 


Centra 


Westcoast Energy Inc. 


EBRLG 


35-10 


Consumers Gas 


Niagara Gas - Ottawa River Project 


EBRLG 


35-11 


Consumers Gas 


Great West Energy - Gas Purchase 


EBRLG 


35-12 


British Gas 


GW Utilities 


EBRLG 


35-13 


Consumers Gas 


Spot Gas Purchases 



31 



Public Participation 



The following individuals, organizations and companies appeared before the Ontario Energy Board at least once 
during the 1992-93 fiscal year. 



A.E. Sharp & Associates Ltd. 

A.E. Sharp Limited 

Admic Controls 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Limited 

Association of Major Power Consumers of Ontario 

Bickford Dawn Group 

Board of Education for the City of York 

Boise Cascade Canada Ltd. 

Canadian Association of Energy Service Companies 

Canadian Gas Association 

Canadian Pacific Forest Products 

Cardinal Power L.P 

Centra Gas Ontario Inc. 

City of Toronto 

Coalition of Environmental Groups for a Sustainable 

Energy Future 

Consumers' Association of Canada (Ontario) 

Consumers Fight Back Association 

Consumers' Gas Company Ltd. 

Corporation of the Town of Fort Frances 

Destec Energy Canada 

Direct Energy Marketing Limited 

Domtar Inc. 

Dow Chemical Canada Inc. 

ECNG Inc. 

Energy Probe 

Environmental Assessment Group 

Fair Rental Policy Organization of Ontario 

Gaz Metropolitan!, inc. 

Great West Energy Limited 

Independent Power Producers Society of Ontario 

Industrial Gas Users Association 

Lake Superior Power Inc. 

Lang, W. 

Metropolitan Separate School Board 

Municipal Electric Association 

Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto 

Munigas Corporation 

Murphy, C. 

Mutual Gas Association 

Natural Resource Gas Limited 

Nitrochem Inc. 

North Canadian Marketing Inc. 

North Canadian Power 

Northland Power 



Northridge Petroleum Marketing Inc. 

Ontario Coalition Against Poverty 

Ontario Hospital Association 

Ontario Hydro 

Ontario Natural Gas Association 

Ottawa/Carleton Gas Purchase Consortium 

Petro-Canada 

Pollution Probe 

Seaway Valley Farmers Energy Cooperative 

Taxpayers Coalition of Brampton 

Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited 

Toronto District Heating Corporation 

TransCanada PipeLines Limited 

TWG Consulting Inc. 

Unigas Corporation 

Union Gas Limited 

Urban Development Institute of Ontario 

Wade, L. 

Western Gas Marketing Limited 



32 



Glossary 



Common Equity Ratio 

The ratio of the common equity to the total capital of a company. 

GlGAJOULE (GJ) 

A measure of energy equal to 1 billion (10 9 ) joules. A typical residential consumer of gas might 
use about 130 gigajoules per year for household heating. 
indicated Rate of return 

The rate of return that a utility earns under a given set of approved rates. 
Rate Base 

The amount that a utility has invested in assets that are used or are useful in providing sendee, 
minus accumulated depreciation, plus an allowance for working capital and any other items 
which the Board may determine. Rate base may also be net of accumulated deferred income 
taxes. 

Rate of Return on Common Equity 

Utility income applicable to the common equity component of a utility's total capital, that a utili- 
ty earns or is authorized to earn, expressed as a percentage of the amount of common equity 
approved for inclusion in the utility's capital structure. 
Rate of Return on Rate Base 

Utility income, after taxes, that a utility earns or is authorized to earn, expressed as a percentage 
of the rate base. This return is not guaranteed to the utility. Rather, this is the return that the 
company has a reasonable opportunity to earn given forecast conditions. 
Required Rate of Return 

The rate of return that a utility proposes it needs to earn in order to achieve a reasonable return 
under an assumed set of projected conditions. 
Revenue Deficiency 

The shortfall between the revenues required to achieve the allowed annual level of earnings pre- 
viously established by the Board and the revenues that will be produced with currently approved 
rates. 

Revenue Requirement 

The amount of revenue that a utility must recover through rates to cover its costs of providing 
service. The costs are determined by adding the allowed expenses of the utility to the approved 
return on rate base. 
Test. Year 

A prospective period of twelve consecutive months (usually the company's next full fiscal year) 
for which projections of revenues, costs, expenses and rate base are submitted to the Board as 
part of a utility's rates application. 



33 






Commissi 
energie de l'ontario 




Table des matieres 






Message de la presidente 



Membres de la commission 



introduction 

Lenergie en Ontario 

fonctions et responsabil1tes de la commission 

Structure et ressources de la Commission 



Faits saillants DE L'EXERCICE 1992-1993 

(se terminant le 31 mars 1993) 



Pour une plus grande participation du public 

Amelioration des methodes de travail 

activites au sein de la communaute des tribunaux administrates 

mesures de rationalisation 

Recapitulation des activites 

Etude de la planification integree des ressources en gaz 

Examen des tarijs de vente en gros d'Ontario Hydro 

Audiences relatives aux tarijs du gaz naturel 

Demandes relatives a des gazoducs 

Autres rapports 



I 



LlSTE DES CAS TRAITES 



INTERVENANTS 



LEXIQUE 



La page 

ouverture illustri 

une carotte de 

FORAGE. 

Dans I'industrie du gaz 
naturel, on preleve des carottes 
de forage pour determiner les 
caracteristiques structurelles et 

I'integrite des reservoirs 
de stodiage du gaz. 






Les bureaux de la Commission de I'cnergie de I'Ontario sont situes an : 

2300 me Yonge Bureau 2601 

Toronto ON M4P 1E4 (416)481-1967 

On peut se procurer des exemplaires du present rapport et d'autves publications de la Commission 
a la librairie du gouvemement de I'Ontario au 880 rue Bay, Toronto, til. : (416) 326-5320. 

Les personnes habitant a I'exterieur de Toronto peuvent s'adresser a Publications Ontario, ser- 
vice des commandes postales, 50 rue Grosvenor, Toronto ON M7A1N8. Pour les appels 
interurbains sansfrais, composez le 1 800 668-9938. 

ISSN 0317-4891 

Photographies des membres de la Commission joumies par Vincmzo Pietropaulo. Autres vhotogra- 
phies Joumies par Centra Gas Ontario Inc., The Coiisumcrs'Gfls Company Ltd., Ontario Hydro el 
Union Gas Limited. 

*7\ Imprime au Canada surdu papier Beckett Expression contenant 50 % de fibres ncycUes 
' avec25 % de dechets de consommation. 




Minister 
Ministre 



Ministry of 
Environment 
and Energy 



Ministere de 
I'Enviropnement 
et de I'Energie 



1 35 St Clair Avenue West 

Suite 100 

Toronto ON M4V1P5 



1 35, avenue St Clair ouest 

Bureau 1 00 

Toronto ON M4V1P5 



A Son Honneur Henry N.R. Jackman 
Lieutenant-gouverneur de la 
province de 1' Ontario 



II me fait grand plaisir de vous presenter le rapport annuel de 
la Commission de l'energie de 1' Ontario pour l'annee budgetaire 
1992-1993. 

Veuillez agreer, Son Honneur, 1' assurance de ma tres haute 
consideration . 



Le ministre, 




Cjfc^M^ 



C.J. (Bud) Wildman 



0761 G (04/93) 



100% Unbleached Post -Consumer Slock 



Message de la Presidente 



Les tribunaux de reglementation 
doivent s'adapter aux nouvelles 
realites economiques 



La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario est fiere d'inter- 
venir dynamiquement dans les secteurs du gaz naturel et 
de l'electricite. dans notre economie, ils assurent un service 
essentiel a des milliers d'entreprises et a des millions de foyers 
de maniere sure, fiable et economique, tout en tenant compte de 



LA QUALITE DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT. 

Chargee de veiller a ce que les tarifs 
soient justes et l'approvisionnement 
regulier, ainsi que de proteger l'interet 
de la population, la Commission se doit 
aussi d'etre bien informee des effets 
eventuellement dommageables et con- 
tre-productifs de gestes imprudents. 

La volonte de restreindre les depenses 
publiques et revolution rapide du marche 
obligent aujourd'hui les organismes de 
reglementation, aussi bien que les societes 
de services publics et leurs clients, a se 
toumer resolument vers l'innovation; si Ton 
veut que le prix du gaz naturel et de l'elec- 
tricite continue d'etre equitable aux yeux du 
consommateur, c'est dans la concertation 
qu'il faudra trouver la solution aux pro- 
blemes que rencontre l'industrie. Pour 
rester efficaces, les tribunaux administratifs 
doivent etre disposes a s'adapter aux condi- 
tions nouvelles. 

Dans son desir constant de s'ameliorer, 
la Commission a cree plusieurs projets qui 
portent notamment sur le reglement nego- 
cie des conflits, une periode d'essai de deux 



ans, la revision des lois pertinentes et la 
tenue d'audiences generales ou conjointes. 
EUe a renouvele ses politiques et methodes 
dans le domaine de l'indemnisation des 
intervenants, qui se fait maintenant plus 
rapidement. EUe est egalement en voie de 
modemiser son systeme de surveillance du 
rendement financier des societes de gaz 
naturel et de modifier les methodes compta- 
bles dont elles se servent pour produire 
leurs rapports financiers. Toutes ces initia- 
tives partagent un meme objecrif fondamen- 
tal : rendre le processus de reglementa- 
tion et le fonctionnement interne de la 
Commission plus efficaces. La reduction du 
cout de nos travaux et le rehaussement de 
leur qualite seront la mesure de notre reus- 
site. 

Le lecteur trouvera dans le present 
document une relation precise de nos prin- 
cipales realisations de l'annee, ainsi qu'un 
resume de nos decisions et rapports les 
plus importants. Le tout temoigne de 
l'ardeur des membres et du personnel de la 
Commission qui fonnent une equipe parti- 



m. 



culierement talentueuse et experimentee. 
Cest grace aux efforts constants de ces gens 
devoues que la Commission a pu tant faire 
depuis un an. 

Sensible aux imperatifs defficacite, la 
Commission favorise le maintien des pe- 
riodes de reference de deux ans et des 
reglements negocies, mesures toutes deux 
instaurees Tan dernier. La premiere nous 
permet de fixer les tarifs pour deux annees 
et de realiser ainsi des economies, tandis 
que la seconde, axee sur le partage des 
idees et des preoccupations, entraine sou- 
vent le reglement des questions en suspens 
avant meme que ne debute l'audience. Une 
strategic fondee sur la concertation opti- 
mise le processus de prise des decisions, 
que les discussions aient lieu en prive ou 
dans la salle d'audience, en donnant a 
toutes les parties Toccasion de mieux 
exprimer leur opinion dans une atmo- 
sphere plus detendue. Bien que Ton ne 
puisse encore tirer de conclusions formelles 
quant a l'emploi de cette methode, elle a ete 
favorablement accueillie au sein de l'indus- 
trie et nous sommes convaincus quelle sera 
profitable a long terme. 

Les audiences generates ou conjointes 
sont un autre moyen de rendre plus efficace 
le processus de reglementation. Nous y 
avons recours quand un probleme 
demande une solution expeditive, quand 
nos decisions risquent dexercer un effet 



considerable sur les politiques et la regie- 
mentation et quand il est plus economique 
de considerer en une seule audience des 
questions partageant des caracteristiques 
communes. 

A l'aube du XXl e siecle, un organisme 
de reglementation efficace doit aussi se 
preoccuper de preserver la propriete com- 
mune que constitue notre patrimoine 
environnemental. Il y a deux ans, la 
Commission, faisant etat des liens qui 
unisserit I'energie, l'environnement et 
leconomie, a mis sur pied un processus a 
volets multiples, connu sous le nom de 
«planification integree des ressources en 
gaz natureb et en vertu duquel on envi- 
sage l'exploitation des entreprises four- 
nisseuses de maniere a garantir les 
approvisionnements au moindre cout, 
grace a un ensemble bien pense de 
mesures agissant dune part sur l'offre et 
d'autre part sur la demande. Lan dernier, 
nous avons tenu une audience generate 
qui s'est penchee surtout sur les outils de 
gestion de la demande. Nous avons ainsi 
reussi a formuler des lignes directrices 
pour la mise en oeuvre dun plan sectoriel 
qui assurera le juste equilibre entre les 
preoccupations environnementales et 
financieres. Nous avons recommande que 
les societes de gaz naturel se joignent a 
daurres intervenants pour mettre au point 
des moyens d'integrer, dans les tarifs, le 



Innovations 

■ Reglement negocie des conjlits 

■ Exercices de reference de deux ans 

■ Audiences conjointes ou generates 



£&$' 



Questions d'ordre 
en vi ron ne mental 

■ Planifkation integree des 

ressourccs en gaz 
m Gestion de I'ekctrkite 
m Lignes directrices pom la 

construction de gazoducs 



cout des facteurs sociaux et environ- 
nementaux, ainsi que les bienfaits 
eventuels des investissements consentis. 

Dans le cadre de notre examen des 
hausses de tarifs proposees pour 1993 par 
Ontario Hydro concernant la vente d'elec- 
trieite en gros, nous avons tenu compte 
des mesures quelle a prises pour mieux 
gerer la demande. Dans notre rapport au 
Ministre, nous avons souligne que ce type 
de mesures doit etre soumis a une etude 
aussi rigoureuse que celles qui ciblent 
l'offre. Nous avons aussi recommande 
qu'Ontario Hydro organise des ateliers 
avec ses interlocuteurs afin dexaminer et 
de rafliner ses propres programmes de ges- 
tion energetique et qu'elle redouble 
d'efforts pour en surveiller revolution afin 
de s'assurer que ses fonds soient investis a 
bon escient. 

En terminant cette revue des projets 
que nous avons mis en oeuvre pour mieux 
repondre aux preoccupations environ- 
nementales, soulignons que nos lignes 
directrices en matiere de localisation, de 
construction et dexploitation de gazoducs 
en Ontario sont actuellement en voie de 
revision. Nous comptons en modifier la 
portee de maniere qu'elles visent egale- 
ment les activates complementaires dans 
Toptique de Tamenagement urbain et 
dune plus grande panicipation du public. 
Celle-ci est d'ailleurs indispensable a la 



qualite du processus de reglementation, 
tout comme la communication constante 
avec les divers groupes qui s'interessent 
a nos audiences. Pour consolider 
nos activites de communication, nous* 
avons mis au point un bulletin intitule 
^Regulatory Agenda», concu pour faire 
mieux connaitre nos travaux, et avons 
publie les premiers resumes de nos deci- 
sions en matiere de tarifs. La box sur k pro- 
jet d'aide jinanciere mix intervenants, dont le 
gouvernement a reporte lecheance a 1996. 
est egalement destinee a favoriser la partici- 
pation de la population, en soutenant 
financierement les interlocuteurs admissi- 
bles qui, sans elle, ne pourraient se permet- 
tre de faire valoir leur point de vue. 

Dans le but d'offrir des services de 
meilleure qualite, nous avons aussi amorce 
une revision des lois et reglements qui 
nous regissent. Notre objectif premier est 
de presenter au gouvernement des recom- 
mandations alignees sur revolution du 
marche, notamment en ce qui a trait a la 
dereglementation des prix du gaz et a 
l'apparition des options d'achat direct, 
eventualites que ne pouvait prevoir le le- 
gislateur. Nous avons en outre remis a 
letude nos regies provisoires de pratique et 
de procedure, que nous avions deja modi- 
fiees le l er Janvier demier conformement 
au remaniement de notre processus 
d'indemnisation, dans le cadre de notre 



programme damelioration de la qualite. 

Pour nous assurer que la Commission 
reste au fait des evenements les plus mar- 
quants et que sa conduite s'accorde avec 
celle de ses homologues, nous tenons a 
demeurer actifs dans les cercles de la justice 
administrative. Ma propre contribution en 
ce domaine mamene a occuper actuelle- 
ment le poste de secretaire de la section des 
presidents d organismes de la Society oj 
Ontario Adjudicators and Regulators et a 
assurer la copresidence de la conference 
convoquee en 1993 par le Conseil des tri- 
bunaux administratifs canadiens. J'ai aussi 
preside le comite des questions energe- 
tiques de l'Association des membres des tri- 
bunaux dutilite publique du Canada, tout 
en siegeant a son conseil de direction. 

Tandis que la Commission de l'energie 
de TOntario s'efforcait de rehausser l'effica- 
cite de son exploitation, le gouvernement 
cherchait a faire de meme dans lensemble 
de ses activites. En creant le ministere 
de l'Environnement et de l'Energie en 
fevrier 1993, il regroupait deux secteurs de 
plus en plus apparentes. Son Conseil de 
gesrion a egalement entrepris un vaste reex- 
amen du systeme ontarien cForganismes 
gouvemementaux afin de le rationaliser. La 
Commission elle-meme a joue un role acuf 
au sein des groupes d'etude, dont certaines 
recommandations ont recu Fapprobation de 
principe du Cabinet. 



Lune des plus grandes priorites que 
je me suis fixees pour Favenir consistcra 
a collaborer avec nos interlocuteurs afin 
d'ameliorer la qualite des services que 
fournit la Commission. Nous voulons 
recueillir l'opinion de chacun, de maniere 
que toutes les attentes soient prises en 
compte. Vu la conjoncture commerciale 
actuelle et nos previsions quant a ce qu'il 
adviendra, notamment dans le domaine 
de la dereglementation, nous devons 
rcdefinir notre vocation d'apres les nou- 
velfes tendances et orienter les travaux de 
la Commission de facon a offrir a nos 
clients les services qu'ils recherchent wai- 
ment. Cest uniquement cette vision de 
l'avenir qui nous garantira de toujours 
oeuvrer dans finteret de la population et 
de l'industrie gaziere. 

En poursuivant sans relache sa quete 
defficacite, la Commission sera en mesure 
de repondre encore aux attentes de ceux 
et celles qui ont besoin de ses services. 

La presidente, 




Marie C. Rounding 



MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION (AU 31 MARS 1993) 



MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION 



Presidente 
Marie C. Rounding 




U me Rounding avocate et ex-enseignanh 

depuis !e I"' janviei 1992 la presidence de la 
Commission, don! elle a ete membre de 1984 a 
1987. An coursde sa aimcvc. elle a egalement agi 
[ iimmf conseillere juridique aupres du mil 
del'Energii i ices 

juridrques du ministere des Institutions fmancieres 
el jsMinic- id /ivK tion ilf directrice du Bureau ili-s 
avocats de !a Cowvnne - Droit civil, aupres du 
: in general. M""- Rounding 
preside egalemen! k-ioiivildailmiiiMi-aiioiiilii 
Doctors Hospital de Tcuoiko. 

VICE-PRESIDENT 
Orville J. Cook 




M. Cook a exerci sa pio/i-ssion de comptable 
agri i i n pratiqu privee avanl de se ii'i/idreau 
personnel de la Commission en J 961. 11 _y a 
depuis lors occupe divers postes dt gestion 
supi rii ti in ilt' 

i'analysi finani ii n d< !' tploitation el des 

d'tnergie M. Look siege a 
la Commission depuis Janvier 1985 el en a e"te lc 
president interimaire pi nila/u les six derniers 
dicimIi' 1991. Ila t'd- nomm ;ident en 

titre i'ii novembre 1991 



MEMBRES : 



Carl A. Wolf Jr. 




Wol/s'est joint a la Commission 
en septembre 1986, foil d'une 
experience de 29 ans aupres de 
lasociiti Union Carbide, ou il 
a notammentitt charge de 
gem les questions energetiques, 
Uaegalernentoccupelavice- 
presiderure de ['.Association des 

consommateursindustriels degaz el a /ait partie de nombreux 
tments sectori .gouvernementauxprioc- 

cupesde politique energedque. 

* Richard R. Perdue 

M. Perdue siege a temps par- 
tielau seindela Commission 
depuis/evriei 1990, apresen 
avoir etc membre a temps 
plein ilc 1981 a 1986. 





C. William W. Darling 

M. Darling a ete nomme 
membre de la Commission 
en fevriet J 990. a la /in de 
sci longur carriere aupres 
de la societe Gf-LInc., 
granae consomrnatrice 
d'tnergie dam ses precedes 
de chauffage, de transfor- 
mation et ill' pn paration des • harges d'alimentation. 
Tout juste avanl sa nomination, ily exercait depuis 
Wans ses competences dans lc domaine des achats et 
des politiques hecs a I'energie et aux charges d'alimenta- 
tion. Il a obtenu une maitnse es sciences (genie < hi- 
mique) de Wniversite Queen's. 

Pamela W. Chapple 

M""' Chapple, avocate. a 
quittc la Commission des 
valeurs mobilitres de 
I'Ontano pour se joindie a 
la Commission de I'energie 
en fuillel 1990. Sacarrvtre 
I'avait precedemment 
amentea oeuvret aupres 

d'autres organismes gouvernementaux et du Bureau 

de I'ombudsman de I'lMtano. 






Judith C. Allan 

M""' Allan, qui agissait aw \ 
rantenqualifc dedirecti 
I'analyse des marches et de la 
prevision aupres de la societe 
TransCanada Pipelines, siege 
a la Commission depuis 
A % I septembre 1 990. Elk a obtenu un 

^ ▼ ImaiauiMenmatJiematiques.de 

mime qu'une maitnse en sciences eccmomiques el en administration. 

Edward J. Robertson 

M. Robertson, qui s'esl 
joint a la Commissi 
mai 1992, & 

vant president do la com- 
mission des services publics 
du Manitoba. Apres avoir 
acquis une longue expe- 
rience dansl'entreprise 
privie britannique, il a occupe divers pastes dans lajonc- 
lion publiquc canadienne, notamment celui de chefdc la 
direction de la societe de telephone du Manitoba. 

Cheryl L. Cottle 

M"" Cottle, avocate, occupait 
auparavant k paste de conseillere 
/uridique principale aupres du 
ministere duProcurturg 
elles'interi Serementau 

projet derejorme delay.. 
automobile. Representante de la 
Commission aupres des tribunaux 
de 1985 a 1 988, elk en est membie depuis mai 1 992. 

* Judith B. Simon 

Specialiste des questions 
enwvnnemenlaks. 

temps 
paruelau seindela 
Commission depuis mai 
1992. Chef de service 
aupres des ministeri 
I'liiditstncdu Commerce 
et de In Technology el de I'Environnement, elk aa 
parti ip aux travaux de planification du mi 
I'Energie. Aujourd'hw en pratique pi i wswl- 

tante, connail particulitremenl hen les evaluations 
mentalesei les hens enire I'economieet I'environnement 
mbresa temps partiel 





Introduction 



L'energie en Ontario 



le gaz naturel revet une grande importance pour l'ontario 
comme source d'energie et comme matiere premiere et 
charge d'ali mentation dans l'industrie des produits chimiques. 
Principal combustible de tous les secteurs de Leconomie, sauf 
celui des transports, il occupe egalement la premiere place 
quand il sagit de chauffer les batiments ou l'eau. 

Lelectricite compte aussi parmi les sources d energie de premier plan, car elle est indispen- 
sable dans bien des domaines, notamment Fappareillage electrique et le materiel informatique. 

Dans Industrie, les foyers, les etablissements commerciaux et le secteur institutionnel, le 
gaz naturel est la principale source d energie. En fait, FOntario en consomme plus que toute autre 
province, car elle represente pres de 40 pour 100 de la demande canadienne totale. 

Le gaz represente quelque 32 pour 100 de lenergie consommee en Ontario, contre environ 
19 pour 100 pour Mectricite. Le petrole, le charbon, le bois et les liquides de gaz naturel (comme 
le gaz propane) viennent completer la liste des sources d energie utilisees dans la province. 
Vente et distribution du gaz naturel 

Pres de 94 pour 100 du gaz naturel consomme en Ontario vient des provinces de l'Ouest, 
achemine par les gazoducs de la TransCanada PipeLines et les reseaux associes. Environ 2 pour 
100 de nos approvisionnements nous proviennent des Etats-Unis et quelque 3 pour 100, de 
notre propre production. 

En Ontario, le gaz naturel est surtout distribue par trois societes qui toutes detiennent une 
concession pour approvisionner une region particuliere de la province. Comme le transport du 
gaz exige un investissement considerable dans la construction de gazoducs et d'installations de 
stockage, le monopole demeure la plus efficace des 
formules, car il evite d'onereux redoublements. 

Le cout du gaz provenant de l'Ouest canadien 
compte pour pres du tiers du tarif residentiel type; 
s'y ajoutent les frais de transport et de distribution, 
ainsi que les frais d'exploitation du fournisseur. 

Depuis le milieu des annees quatre-vingt, la 
dereglementation a fait evoluer le marche a bien 
des points de vue. Le prix de gros du gaz n'est plus 
fixe par 1'Alberta et le gouvernement canadien, 
mais varie desormais selon les lois de la concur- 
rence : les acheteurs peuvent maintenant choisir de 
s approvisionner directement aupres du producteur 
ou de continuer a acheter aupres d'un distributeur. 
Dans le premier cas, ils doivent cependant conclure 
une entente de transport avec la TransCanada 
PipeLines. 

Les etablissements qui consomment peu de 
gaz preferent souvent l'achat direct collectif. Les 
societes qui mettent de tels regroupements sur pied 



Demande totale de 
gaz naturel 

(en milliards de metres cubes) 
Volumes redresses enjonction des 
variations de degres-jours 
25 



20 



15 






10- 







■ mn 

mill 

'87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 



Transports 

■ Agriculture 

■ Secteur Industrie] 
Secteur commercial 

■ Secteur residentiel 
Source : Ontario Natural Gas 

Association 



Concessions pour la distribution du gaz naturel 



O N T A 




Demande residen- 
tielle d'energie 
(en petajoules) 

Demande de gaz et de mazout 
redressee enfonction des varia- 
tions de degres-jours 

500 — 



400 



300 



200 



100 






'87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 

■ Gaz de petrole liquejie 

■ Electricite 
Mazout leger 

■ Gaz naturel 

Source : Ontario Natural Gas 
Association 



negocient habituellement avec des producteurs ou des distributeurs pour assurer l'approvision- 
nement de tous les membres et prennent ensuite les dispositions requises pour le transport du 

gaz. 

L'ELECTRICITE 

En Ontario, une societe du gouvernement provincial, appelee Ontario Hydro, est princi- 
pale responsable de la production et du transport de Felectricite. 

Dans la quasi-totalite des villes et agglomerations, un organisme municipal possede et 
exploite le reseau local de distribution. II achete l'electricite a Ontario Hydro, au tarif de gros, et 
la revend a ses abonnes residentiels et commerciaux. Ontario Hydro approvisionne aussi 
directement pres de 836 000 consommateurs ruraux et 103 grands etablissements industriels. 

A ces derniers et aux municipalites, Ontario Hydro fournit Felectricite aux tarifs de vente 
en gros, dont Finfluence, dans le marche ontarien de lenergie, est considerable. 

reseau de gazoducs de l'Ontario 



r 



."tec, 



***** 



«*, 



*<*» 



< 



\, 



O N T 


A R 


1 O 




ttcccccccctcttttt,^ 








Lac Superieur 




■ 













«*«* 



Quebec 



I 



<iA 



LEGEXDE 

ccec TransCanada PipeLines 

■•■■ Union Gas 

••"• Centra Cms 
••■•• Great Luke*. 
■ ■■ Panhandle Eastern 
— Empire State 
mm Tennessee Gas 
«■• Iroquois 




fonctions et responsabilites de 
la Commission 



La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario est chargee de 
reglementer l'industrie ontarienne du gaz naturel et 
d'etudier les modifications que veut apporter ontario hydro 
a ses tarifs de vente en gros. elle agit egalement a titre de 
conseiller, en matiere energetique, aupres des ministres de 
l'environnement et de l'energie et des rlchesses naturelles, 
ainsi que du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil. 

Dans toutes ses activites, la Commission vise avant tout a servir le public et a proteger ses 
interets. Quand elle fixe des tarifs ou fait des recommandations, elle est tenue de concilier les 
attentes des consommateurs et des investisseurs, de meme que les exigences de la protection 
environnementale. 
Fixation des tarifs du gaz naturel 

Les societes de gaz naturel ontariennes ne sont pas autorisees a fixer elles-memes leurs prix 
de vente. La loi les oblige a faire approuver leurs echelles de tarifs par la Commission de l'energie 
de l'Ontario. Celle-ci tient a ce sujet, pour chaque societe, une audience publique qui dure 
generalement de trois a quatre semaines. Dans le cas d'achats directs aupres du producteur, la 
Commission a droit de regard sur les frais qui peuvent etre exiges pour le transport du gaz 
jusqu'en Ontario. 

Les tarifs ne sont pas les memes pour les consommateurs residentiels, commerciaux et 
industriels; il existe egalement un tarif de vente en gros. Avant de prendre une decision, la 
Commission voudra d'abord etablir l'ampleur des sommes que la societe de distribution doit 
raisonnablement consacrer au maintien de l'ensemble de son reseau. Ensuite, elle tiendra 
compte des couts associes aux fluctuations de la demande des differentes categories de consom- 
mateurs. 

Ainsi, la demande de gaz naturel pour le chauffage residentiel varie selon la temperature et 
le moment de la journee. II en coute done plus cher, par unite, pour approvisionner les abonnes 
residentiels que les etablissements industriels, ces derniers utilisant de grandes quantites de gaz a 
des volumes plus constants. 

La Commission veille done a ce que les tarifs soient aussi modiques que possible, tout en assu- 
rant aux actionnaires des fournisseurs un rendement suffisant sur leur investissement. Ses decisions 
doivent etre justes et raisonnables pour les consommateurs comme pour les investisseurs. 

Avant d'arreter une decision, la Commission prend en consideration les depenses 
anterieures, actuelles et futures des societes fournisseuses et leur demande de justifier leurs 
chiffres. Elle tient egalement compte de la conjoncture et de son evolution, des revenus que 
prevoient de recevoir les societes de gaz et de la qualite des services qu'elles offrent. 

Si la situation financiere d'un fournisseur se modifie considerablement entre deux au- 
diences, la Commission peut convoquer une seance speciale pour accorder un redressement tari- 
faire provisoire a l'avantage soit de l'entreprise elle-meme, soit de ses clients. Ces redressements 
sont sujets a revision et ne deviennent definitifs qu'au moment ou la Commission rend sa deci- 
sion finale et emet une ordonnance a cette fin. 

La Commission decide des prix que peuvent demander quatre societes de distribution de 



Les tarifs doivent etre cquitablcs 
et raisonnables tant pour les con- 
sommateurs que pour les action- 
naires. 



Taux de rendement 
approuve des 
actions ordinaires 



(en pourcentage) 



15 



12- 
9- 

6- 
3- 
n 

















•89 '90 '91 '92 

Exercke financier 

■ Centra Gas 

(exercice se terminant le 31 dec.) 

Consumers Gas 

(exercice se terminant le 30 sept.) 

■ Union Gas 

(exercice se terminant le 3 J mars) 



gaz en Ontario, a savoir Consumers' Gas Company Ltd. (Consumers Gas), Union Gas Limited 
(Union), Centra Gas Ontario Inc. (Centra) et Natural Resource Gas Limited (NRG). 

Consumers Gas estle plus important distributeur canadien de gaz naturel; elle 
dessert quelque 1 117 000 abonnes residentiels, commerciaux et industriels dans le sud, le cen- 
tre et Test de l'Ontario. La British Gas Holdings (Canada) Limited detient pres de 85 pour 100 
de ses actions ordinaires; les 15 pour 100 restants appartiennent a des particuliers ayant repon- 
du a l'offre emise au cours de l'annee. 

Union occupe le deuxieme rang parmi les distributeurs de gaz de la province; sa clien- 
tele est concentree dans le sud-ouest de l'Ontario. Elle exploite egalement un reseau de gazo- 
ducs et d'installations de stockage et de surpression qui dessert certains clients et d'autres 
societes de services publics etablis dans Test de la province, au Quebec et aux Etats-Unis. Au 
total, elle compte pres de 657 000 abonnes residentiels, commerciaux et industriels. Union 
appartient a la societe Westcoast Energy Inc. 

Centra dessert environ 150 agglomerations du nord et de Test de l'Ontario. Son 
reseau se compose de plusieurs gazoducs branches au reseau de transport de la TransCanada 
PipeLines, de Kenora aux rives du lac Ontario et jusqu'au Saint-Laurent. Sa clientele atteint pres 
de 201 200 abonnes. Elle appartient egalement a Westcoast Energy Inc. 

NRG est un petit fournisseur; sa clientele de pres de 2 600 abonnes est regroupee dans la 
region d'Aylmer. 

On trouve en Ontario cinq autres petites societes de gaz qui sont exemptees de la regie- 
mentation des tarifs prevue par la loi creant la Commission, ainsi que deux organismes munici- 
paux de distribution sur lesquels celle-ci n'a pas competence. 

EXAMEN DES TARIFS D'ONTARIO HYDRO 

Cest en 1974 que la Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario a ete pour la premiere fois 
chargee d'etudier les modifications de tarifs de vente en gros envisagees par Ontario Hydro. 
Cette derniere dessert directement et indirectement plus de 3,71 millions de consommateurs, 
dont 86 pour 100 sont des abonnes residentiels. 

Les tarifs de vente en gros d'Ontario Hydro sont fixes par son propre conseil d'administra- 
tion. La societe est cependant tenue de soumettre tout projet de modification a l'attention du 
ministre de l'Environnement et de l'Energie, qui saisit la Commission du dossier en lui four- 
nissant toutes les donnees techniques et financiers pertinentes. 

A Tissue d'une audience publique qui dure generalement quatre semaines, la Commission 
redige un rapport assorti de recommandations a l'intention du ministre. Le role de la Commission 
etant consultatif, ces recommandations n'ont pas force executoire pour Ontario Hydro. 
Renvois et audiences generales 

Le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil, le ministre de l'Environnement et de l'Energie et 
celui des Richesses naturelles peuvent demander a la Commission de tenir une audience 
publique sur une question precise et de leur faire rapport. Ces renvois portent d'ordinaire sur 
des questions liees a l'energie et suscitent souvent un vif interet parmi le public. La encore, la 
Commission joue un role consultatif, sans plus. Elle peut cependant, de sa propre initiative, 
convoquer des audiences generales pour examiner des questions qui relevent de sa competence. 
Approbation de nouveaux gazoducs 

Les societes qui desirent construire un gazoduc en Ontario doivent obtenir au prealable 
l'autorisation de la Commission. Celle-ci decide si le projet va dans le sens des interets du pu- 
blic apres l'avoir examine du point de vue de la securite, de la rentabilite, des retombees pour la 



to 



cQllectivite, de la fiabilite des approvisionnements et des incidences environnementales. 

Tous les projets de construction de gazoducs sont aussi soumis a Fattention du Comite 
ontarien de coordination des pipelines (COCP), qui est preside par un membre de la 
Commission. Le COCP est un comite interministeriel charge des questions de securite et des 
repercussions environnementales relatives a la construction de telles installations. II se compose 
de representants des ministeres de 1' Agriculture et de l'Alimentation, de FEnvironnement et de 
FEnergie, de la Consommation et du Commerce, des Richesses naturelles, de la Culture, du 
Tourisme et des Loisirs, des Affaires municipales et des Transports. Au besoin, des organismes 
regionaux peuvent egalement participer a ses travaux. 

Dans son analyse des projets, le Comite cherche a s'assurer que la construction de pipelines 
n'entrainera pas, a long terme, de consequences nefastes pour l'environnement et que les pertur- 
bations a court terme resteront minimes pendant les travaux. Pour ce faire, le Comite etudie 
chaque proposition, examine les divers traces et emplacements possibles et regie toutes les ques- 
tions soulevees avant qu'une demande officielle d'autorisation de construire ne soit presentee a la 
Commission. 

Les attentes de la Commission en matiere de protection de Fenvironnement sont exprimees 
dans les lignes directrices quelle a adoptees a Fegard de la localisation, de la construction et de 
Fexploitation de gazoducs. Leur libelle, qui date du milieu des annees quatre-vingt, se trouvait en 
voie de revision en 1992-1993. Le groupe charge de cette tache a recueilli Fopinion des societes 
fournisseuses, du gouvernement et des autres intervenants interesses. 

Les nouvelles lignes directrices sur la protection de Fenvironnement s'appliqueront a de 
nouveaux domaines, notamment Famenagement de reservoirs de stockage et la construction de 
postes de surpression, de coupure et de comptage. Concues a l'origine pour les regions rurales, 
elles seront dorenavant plus exigeantes en matiere de planification pour les projets visant des 
zones urbaines. Par ailleurs, elles favoriseront une plus grande participation du public en etablis- 
sant un mecanisme mieux structure de consultation et dexamen, apte a repondre aux interroga- 
tions avant le choix de l'emplacement ou du trace. 
Approbation des accords de concession 

Toute municipality peut accorder a une societe de gaz le droit de fournir un service sur son 
territoire et d'y utiliser ou d'amenager des emprises routieres et autres. La Commission doit 
cependant approuver les conditions particulieres de l'accord de concession. Bon nombre des 
accords actuels, qui remontent a 30 ans ou plus, arrivent bientot a echeance. Le modele d accord 
etabli en 1988 fixe les conditions devant presider a leur renouvellement ou a la conclusion de 
nouveaux accords. 
Certificats d'interet public et de necessite 

Nul ne peut construire un ouvrage d'approvisionnement en gaz sans l'autorisation prealable 
de la Commission. Delivree sous forme de certificat, cette autorisation nest consentie que si 
Finteret public et la necessite justifient le projet. 
Approbation des installations de stockage 

La capacite de stocker le gaz est essentielle au bon fonctionnement du reseau de distribu- 
tion ontarien. La plupart des installations de stockage sont situees dans d'anciennes formations 
geologiques du sud-ouest de la province. Les reserves qu'elles contiennent servent a repondre 
aux fluctuations de la demande et a parer aux situations d'urgence. 

En regie generate, le gaz est stocke pendant Fete, quand la demande est faible et le prix 
moins eleve; il est recupere pendant la periode hivernale, quand la consommation est plus forte. 



La capacite de stockage est un 
element essence! du mean 
ontarien de distribution du 
gaz naturel. 



ii 



Constmction d'un gazoduc de 
Centra a I'ete 1992 ajin d'ali- 
menter la localite de Beardmore 
pres de Geraldton, dans le nord 
de ('Ontario. 



De cette facon, les distributeurs ontariens peuvent equilibrer leurs reserves sur toute I'annee et 
profiter de prix plus avantagcux, tout en assurant l'exploitation efficace du reseau de gazoducs 
provenant de l'Ouest canadien. 

II est interdit de stocker du gaz dans des formations geologiques qui ne sont pas designees 
a cette fin. La Commission recommande au lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil les emplacements 
admissibles a la designation et autorise leur utilisation. Elle decide aussi de l'indemnite payable 
aux personnes sous les proprietes desquelles se trouvent les reservoirs si les parties ne peuvent 
en arriver a une entente. 

Les demandes de permis de forage de puits dans une zone designee aux fins du stockage 
doivent etre soumises a l'examen de la Commission par le ministre des Richesses naturelles, au 
nom duquel ces permis sont delivres. Celui-ci est par ailleurs tenu de se conformer aux recom- 
mandations de la Commission en cette matiere. 

La Commission reglemente egalement divers autres volets du secteur du forage et de 
['exploitation des puits de gaz et de petrole. 
Vente d'interets dans des societes de services publics 

La societe de services publics qui desire vendre ses actifs ou se fusionner a une autre doit 
au prealable sollicker Fautorisation du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil. II en va de meme pour 
tout particulier acquerant une participation de plus de 20 pour 100 dans le capital-actions, de 
toute nature, d'une societe de services publics. Le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil en informe 
la Commission, qui tient audience et fait rapport a ce sujet. 
Respect des engagements 

Avant d'approuver la vente ou la fusion de societes de services publics, le lieutenant-gou- 
verneur en conseil peut exiger qu'elles prennent des engagements precis, notamment en ce qui 
concerne le maintien de leur integrite financiere. 

II arrivera parfois qu'une societe demande a etre liberee d'un de ces engagements arm de realiser 
quelque transaction. La Commission .etablit alors s'il serait opportun de tenir audience a ce sujet, 
etudie la question et peut assortir son approbation des conditions qu'elle juge pertinentes. 




12 



Structure et ressources de la 
Commission 



La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario est un organisme 
de reglementation qui releve du ministre de 
l'environnement et de l'energie et doit respecter les poli- 
tiques administratives dont le gouvernement s'est dote par 
le biais de son conseil de gestion. 

LOIS CONSTITUTIVES 

La plupart des responsabilites de la Commission sont enoncees dans la Loi sur la Commission de 
l'energie de l'Ontario. Six autres lois completent l'eventail de ses competences; ce sont la Loi sur les con- 
cessions mimicipales, la Loi sur les richesses petrolieres, la Loi sur les services publics, la Loi sur /'evalua- 
tion /onciere, la Toronto District Heating Corporation Act et la Loi sur le projet d'aide jinanciere aux 
intervenants. 

La procedure que doit suivre la Commission, en sa qualite de tribunal administratif, est enoncee 
dans la Loi sur I'exercice des competences legales, ainsi que dans ses propres regies provisoires de pra- 
tique et de procedure. 

REEXAMEN de l'encadrement reglementaire 

La nature des services publics evolue au meme rythme que l'environnement economique et 
social. Au cours de l'annee, la Commission a entrepris une vaste revision de la Loi sur la Commission 
de l'energie de l'Ontario, adoptee il y a deja pres de 30 ans. 

La Commission a forme, parmi ses membres et son personnel, un comite auquel elle a confie 
l'execution de l'operauon; des groupes se sont aussi vu attribuer la tache d etudier divers articles de la 
Loi. La Commission compte, a la suite de ces travaux, presenter au ministre de l'Environnement et de 
l'Energie des recommandations visant la mise a jour de la Loi. 

Les regies provisoires de pratique et de procedure, qui regissent depuis quatre ans la tenue des 
audiences, sont egalement en voie de revision. Lexercice 1992-1993 a marque le debut d'un examen 
approfondi, fait a la lumiere de l'experience acquise et des nouvelles attentes. 

Enfin, la Commission parucipe pleinement aux travaux d'un comite cree par la Society oj Ontario 
Adjudicators and Regulators. Ce comite, qui s'interesse a une eventuelle revision de la Loi sur I'exercice 
des competences legales, doit faire des recommandations a la procureure generate. 
Ressources humaines 

La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario se compose de neuf membres oeuvrant a temps plein, y 
compris la presidente et le vice-president, auxquels s'ajoutent deux membres oeuvrant a temps partiel. 
Les audiences de la Commission sont generalement tenues par trois de ses membres. 

Les membres de la Commission sont nommes par le lieutenant-gouvemeur en conseil sur la 
recommandation du ministre de l'Environnement et de l'Energie, qui consulte au prealable le presi- 
dent de l'organisme; leur mandat est de trois ans au maximum. La Commission regroupe des gens de 
professions variees et profite des points de vue differents que peuvent lui apporter economistes, avo- 
cats, ingenieurs, comptables et gens d'affaires. 

Au cours de l'annee, la Commission a accompli ses taches grace a un effectif de 38 employes que 
lui avait accorde le gouvernement, en plus de ses membres reguliers. 

Parmi ces employes, on trouve 13 specialistes des questions techniques qui participent aux au- 
diences, lis ont pour tache de dresser les dossiers de la Commission, c'est-a-dire de s'assurer que celle- 
ci dispose de toutes les donnees requises pour prendre ses decisions. 



La Commission a entrepris une 
etude en projondeur de la Loi 
sur la Commission de l'energie 
de l'Ontario, qui a ere adoptee \l 
yapresde30 ans. 



13 



Le personnel technique veille aussi a la sauvegarde des interets de la population en faisant a la 
Commission des recommandations quant a ses eventuelles decisions. II propose a cette fin diverses 
hypotheses faisant la juste part des voeux des parties et designe generalement la solution qui liii sem- 
ble ideale. Les specialistes qui ne participent pas a une audience restent a la disposition de la 
Commission et l'aident a traiter les questions qui nen sont pas a ce stade de la procedure. Toutes 
leurs recommandations sont accessibles au public. 

La Commission profite aussi de Faide de deux experts-conseils qui, ne participant pas aux au- 
diences, peuvent la soutenir tout au long de celles-ci et de son processus de prise des decisions. lis 
ont aussi pour tache d'etablir des dossiers sur differents sujets, par exemple les tendances indus- 
trielles, et de les tenir a jour. 

Le directeur des enquetes en matiere d energie est charge de surveiller revolution financiere des 
societes de gaz; tous les renseignements dont il dispose restent confidentiels. Quand il constate une 
disparite apparente entre les benefices et le taux de rendement indique de Tune delles, il peut decider 
de tenir une enquete speciale, a Tissue de laquelle la Commission convoquera une audience 
publique et, au besoin, modifiera les tarifs fixes. 

Le secretaire de la Commission veille au bon deroulement des audiences et prend sous sa garde 
tous les documents officiels de lorganisme. Celui-ci dispose egalement d'un conseiller juridique, qui 
prend les decisions requises lors de demandes d'indemnisation et de la repartition des couts. Le 
Groupe de soutien administratif de la Commission assure la gestion de ses finances, de ses 
ressources humaines et de ses installations, et lui oSre des services de soutien dans Texploitation de 
ses systemes d'information. 



Commission de lenergie de l'Ontario 



DlRECTRICE 

OPERATIONS 
TECHNIQUES 

FA Mills 



PRESIDENTE 

M C. Rounding 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

O.J Cook 



Chef principal 
de projets 
MA. Roberts 



COORDONNATEURS 
DE PROJETS 

WA Tsofos 
AL. Stem 

COORDONNATEUR 

ADJOINT DE 

PROJETS 

M / Roth 

(poste a ionlrat) 



Chef 
principal de 

PROJETS 

T. Crawley 



COORDONNATEURS 
DE PROJETS 

AL Drago 
D Barren 



COORDONNATEUR 
ADJOINT DE 

PROJETS 
(pOSte WJiiinP 



CHEF 

PRINCIPAL DE 

PROJETS 

C.J. Chaplin 



CHEF DE PROJETS 
INGENIERIE 

C f Mackic 



CHEF DE 

PROJETS 

ENVIRONNEMENT 

NJ. McKay 



COORDONNATEU 
DE PROJETS 

B L Hewson 



Secretaire de 

la Commission 

(poste vacant) 



Secretaire 
adjoint de la 

Commission 
PHOVell 



Adjointe — 
audiences 

A. Luciani 



Preposee aux 
dossiers 
CA Parkes 



Secretaire de 
la presidente 

J.E. Byrnes 



MEMBRES DE LA 
COMMISSION 

(A TEMPS PLFIN) 

CA W'oij }> 
C.WW. Darling 
PW ChappU ' 
J.C Allan 
C.L. Cotih- 
E.J. Robertson 

(A TEMPS T\R1 1! I ) 

R-R- Perdue 
J B Simon 



CHEF DE LA 

PLANIFICATION 

OPERATIONNELLE 

C. Brow n 



CONSEILLER 
TECHNIQUE 
PRINCIPAL 

D Matthews 



BIBLIOTHECAIRE 

L F Buccilh 



CONSEILLER 
TECHNIQUE 

R Pugh 



avocats de la 

Commission 

C Simons 

Procureur de 

la Commission 

_S McCann 

T. Baumhaid 

(posit d control) 



DIRECTEUR DES 

ENQUETES EN MATIERE 

D'ENERGIE/DIRECTEUR 

DES FINANCES ET DE 

L' ADMINISTRATION 

R.A. Cappadocia 



DIRECTEURS ADJOINTS 

DES ENQUETES EN 
MATIERE D'ENERGIE 

A.M. Parekh 



CHEF DES FINANCES ET DE L* ADMINISTRATION 

A F Mcddows-Taylor 



Adjointe aux 
finances 

S IM 



COMMIS AUX FINANCES 
ET A L'ADMINISTRATION 






Chef de bureau 

PA. Drennen 



Groupe des systemes 



Services de soutien 



Secretaires 
EP Tt, 

N.E Wbodall 

M F ( onnoi 

KA ]ohn 

( u Vifong 

C Martin 



Analyste fonctionnel 
principal 

C. B. Mathis 

ANALYSTE 
FONCTIONNELLE 

G Mayi i I 



RECEPTIONNISTE 

F Lajond 



14 



COMPTE RENDU FINANCIER 

La Loi sur la Commission de I'energie de I'Ontario autorise la Commission a recouvrer une partie 
de ses frais aupres des entreprises de services publics qui participent a ses audiences et autres activites 
connexes. Apres la tenue dune audience, la Commission remet a Fentreprise de services publics en 
cause une ordonnance de couts qui comprend les depenses directes et les debours associes a Fau- 
dience, ainsi qu'une portion des frais fixes de la Commission, dont les frais generaux et les traitements 
de son personnel. 

En 1992-1993, la Commission a decide de recouvrer la totalite de ses frais aupres des entreprises 
de services publics, alors quelle n'en recueillait que 85 pour 100 Fannee precedente. Elle compte 
done financer toute son exploitation, en temps utile, a meme ses ordonnances de couts et liberer ainsi 
le gouvemement provincial de toute charge a cet egard. 

Comme Fillustre le tableau suivant, les depenses de la Commission, pour 1992 1993, se sont 
revelees inferieures de 1 604 405 $ a Fenveloppe budgetaire qui lui avait ete confiee. Cette situation 
est imputable a deux facteurs, soit dune part aux mesures de limitation des depenses publiques - qui 
ont entraine des economies de 742 840 $, comprenant une somme de 306 008 $ au titre des salaires 
et les economies realisees en raison de la diminution du nombre d'audiences par rapport aux previ- 
sions - et d'autre part au rehaussement de fefficacite de la Commission qui a pu epargner 861 565 $ 
en ayant recours aux reglements negocies et aux periodes de reference de deux ans, ainsi qu'en se pre- 
valant des services de son propre conseiller juridique. 

VENTILATION DES DEPENSES DE LA COMMISSION POUR L'EXERCICE 1992 - 1993 



Categorie Depenses prevues 


Depenses reelles 


Solde 


Traitements et salaires 


2 771 000 $ 


2 527 739 $ 


243 261 $ 


Avantages sociaux 


503 400 $ 


440 653$ 


62 747 $ 


Transports et communications 


306800$ 


170 259$ 


136 541 $ 


Services 


2 173 500 $ 


1256 345$ 


917155$ 


Fournitures et materiel 


401 400 $ 


156 699$ 


244 701 $ 


TOTAL 


6 156 100 $ 


4 551 695 $ 


1604405$ 



La Commission recuperera la 
totalite de ses frais dejonction- 
nement aupres des entreprises de 
services publics, ce qui liberera le 
gouvemement de I'Ontario de 
toute charge a cet egard. 



15 



FAITS saillants de L'EXERCICE 1992-1993 



Pour une plus grande 
participation du public 



En 1993, la Commission a adop- 
tc de nowelles politiqucs et 
procedures d'indaimisation. 



LA PRODUCTION DE L'ENERGIE ET SON EXPLOITATION EXERCENT 
DES EFFETS DE LARGE PORTEE; LES TRAVAUX DE LA COMMISSION 
INTERESSENT DONC DE NOMBREUX GROUPES D'INTERET. A NOS AU- 
DIENCES, ON VERRA INTERVENIR AUSSI BIEN DES DEFENSEURS DE L'ENVI- 
RONNEMENT QUE DES ASSOCIATIONS REPRESENTANT LES 
CONSOMMATEURS, DE MEME QUE DES DISTRIBUTEURS, DES FOUR- 
NISSEURS ET DES PROPRIETAIRES FONCIERS. 

Le lecteur trouvera a la fin du present rapport une liste de tous les intervenants qui se sont mani- 
festes devant la Commission en 1992-1993. 
LA Loi sur le projet d'aide financiere aux intervenants 

Pendant de longues annees, seuls les groupes defendant des interets commeidaux particuliers et disposant de 
moyens suffisants pouvaient se permettre dintervenir dans la procedure judiciaire ontarienne. Cest pour favoriser la 
participation des groupes dinteret public que le gouvemement a adopte la Loi sw le pojet dcudejmcoKiffi aux inter- 
venants, qui est entree en vigueur le l er avril 1989, et par le biais de laquelle a ete instaure un projet pilote etale sur 
troisans. 

La Loi a cree un mecanisme permettant de financer davance le recours des intervenants qui comparais- 
sent devant certaines instances officielles, y compris la Commission de Tenergie de rOntario. Les sommes en 
cause doivent etre utilisees pour acquitter les honoraires d'avocats et dexperts-conseils, ainsi que les frais 
administratifs. 

Ces avances de fonds, versees avant l'audience, permettent a ceux qui en beneficient de se faire entendre 
en depit de leur manque de moyens financiers. Ainsi, la Commission a pu frequemment recueillir lopinion de 
regroupements ecologistes et dassociations de consommateurs qui dependent leur cause sans buts lucraufs. 

Avant fadoption de la Loi sur le projet d'aide financial aux intervenants, ni la Commission, ni les autres tri- 
bunaux administratifs ne pouvaient emettre dordonnance tant qu'une audience netait pas terminee. II en est 
encore de meme, mais on deduit des sommes payables a Tissue de la procedure toute l'aide financiere consentie 
a un intervenant avant la tenue de l'audience. 

Avant dentreprendre letude dun cas, la Commission convoque une audience speciale oil elle examine 
les demandes de soutien financier anticipe. Elle se penche particulierement sur les questions que le groupe 
interesse entend soulever lors de l'audience reguliere et sinterroge sur sa capacite de financer lui-meme son 
intervention et de bien representer l'interet de la population. Laudience speciale se deroule devant un seul 
membre de la Commission, choisi parmi ceux qui n'entendront pas l'affaire principale. 

Au cours de l'exercice, la Loi a permis a la Commission d'accorder des avances totalisant 740 110 $ a 
22 groupes differents, parmi lesquels se retrouvaient Pollution Probe, Energy Probe, TAssociation des consom- 
mateurs du Canada (section de rOntario) et rOntario Coalition Against Poverty 

Peu avant l'echeance du projet, le gouvemement a decide de le prolonger de quatre ans, e'est-a-dire 
jusqu'au l er avril 1996. D'ici la, il compte examiner diverses modifications qui lui ont ete proposees. 

NOUVELLES MODALITES D'INDEMNISATION DES INTERVENANTS 

Comme nous l'avons mentionne precedemment, la Commission est autorisee, a la fin dune audience, a 
indemniser les intervenants qui y ont participe. En Janvier 1993, elle a remanie sa politique a cet egard, ainsi 
que les modalites de son application. 

Dorenavant, a Tissue dune audience, la Commission etablit le pourcentage de ses frais qu'un inten'enant 



16 



peut se voir rembourser. Cette proportion peut aller jusqua 100 pour 100 des depenses raisonnablement 
engagees, si la Commission juge que Fintervenant s'est comporte de facon responsable et l'a aidee a bien saisir les 
tenants et aboutissants de Fafiaire. Auparavant, le remboursement maximal s'echelonnait de 70 a 85 pour 100 
des depenses. 

Dans les deux semaines qui suivent la presentation de leur demande dindemnisauon, les requerants 
doivent produire un etat de leurs depenses dresse confonnement aux exigences de la Commission. Levaluateur 
de celle-ci determine si les debourses sont raisonnables et (ait une recommandation quant au montant precis de 
Findemnisation. La decision finale appartient a la Commission. 

Le raccourcissement du delai de presentation des etats de depenses et Famelioration de nos methodes de 
traitement permettent aujourdhui aux intervenants detre indemnises plus rapidemenL A la fin de Fexercice, 
toute la procedure, depuis Faudience jusqua 1 emission de Fordonnance, necessitait huit semaines de moins 
qu'auparavanL 

En 1992-1993, la Commission a emis cinquante-deux ordonnances dindemnisauon des intervenants a la 
conclusion de douze affaires differentes. Les versements totaux ont atteint 1 281 333 $. A l'issue de Fexercice, 
plusieurs demandes en etaient encore au stade de Fexamen. 
Relations exterieures 

Au cours de Fannee, nous nous etions donne pour priorite dameliorer nos communications avec les 
groupes qui ferment notre clientele. 

Le personnel de direction de la Commission a continue de rencontrer regulierement les representants de 
I'Ontario Natural Gas Association, dont sont membres les trois principales societes de gaz. Le comite ainsi forme 
s'etait fixe pour tache de rendre le processus de reglementation plus economique. 

Nous avons aussi lance un nouveau bulletin appele «Rcgukitoi;y Agenda» dans le but dinformer les societes 
de sendees publics, les intervenants et les autres groupes interesses de la progression des audiences portant sur les 
tarifs, des afiaires en cours et des diverses activites de la Commission. Neuf numeros ont ete distribues cette 
anneea48abonnes. 

Nous avons par ailleurs entrepris de rendre le contenu de tous nos formulaires plus facilement comprehen- 
sible et avons commence d'ajouter un resume a toutes nos decisions, pour en rendre la consultation plus aisee. 

Aide financiere aux intervenants - 1992-1993 



Type N° de 


Candidat 




Nombre de Demandes 


Montants 


Montants 


de cas dossier 


requerant 




demandes agreees 


demandes 


accordes 


Demandes relative? 


aux tarifs de gaz 










EBRO 476 


Union 




3 2 


98 819$ 


50 867 $ 


EBRO 479 


Consumers Gas 




3 1 


183 029 $ 


22 779 $ 


Renvoi du ministre 


de l'Energie relativement aux tarifs 






HR 21 


Ontario Hydro 




7 7 


534 341 $ 


298 477 $ 


Audience generate sur la planification 


integree des ressources de gaz 






EBO 169-11 


Consumers Gas 

Union 

Centra 




7 6 


260 551$ 


158 386$ 


EBO 169-111 


Consumers Gas 

Union 

Centra 




6 5 


217 660$ 


159 549$ 


Construction de pipelines et expropriations 








EBLO 244 


Union 




I 1 


106 483 $ 


50 052 $ 


TOTAUX 






27 22 


1 400 882 $ 


740110$ 



17 



Amelioration des methodes 
de travail 



La Commission javorise le regle- 
ment negocie des conflits ajin de 
reduire la duree et la complexity 
des audiences. 



DE CONCERT AVEC LES SOCIETES DE SERVICES PUBLICS ET LES 
AUTRES GROUPES INTERESSES, LA COMMISSION A MIS A 
L'ESSAI DE NOUVELLES METHODES DE TRAVAIL SUSCEPTIBLES DE 
RENDRE PLUS EFFICACE LA PROCEDURE DES AUDIENCES. 

Comme nous l'avons souligne, la Commission participe aux travaux d'un comite perma- 
nent cree en collaboration avec I'Ontario Natural Gas Association, qui represente les trois princi- 
pales entreprises fournisseuses. Grace aux avis exprimes par ce comite, la Commission a adopte 
une serie de mesures innova trices concues pour assouplir ses regies de procedure. II s'agit 
notamment des reglements negocies, des periodes de reference de deux ans et de lignes direc- 
trices concernant le respect des engagements. 

Outre la Commission elle-meme et son personnel, les representants de societes de services 
publics peuvent egalement proposer des projets allant dans le meme sens. Toute modification a 
la procedure reguliere de la Commission doit cependant recevoir l'approbation de celle-ci. 
Reglements negocies 

Au cours de 1'exercice, la Commission a continue de promouvoir le recours aux regle- 
ments negocies et autres mecanismes susceptibles de simplifier et d'accelerer la procedure des 
audiences. 

Laudience qui a porte sur l'emploi de mesures de gestion de la demande dans la planifica- 
tion integree des ressources en gaz est un excellent exemple de l'efficacite de la negociation. 
Pour faciliter les choses, nous avons convoque deux conferences techniques, oil les parties ont 
pu a la fois preciser les enjeux et consolider leurs arguments. 

Lors de la premiere, les intervenants ont expose leur opinion et debattu des questions per- 
tinentes. Le personnel technique de la Commission en a degage un consensus preliminaire 
traduisant les positions de chacun, qu'il a distribue a toutes les parties interessees pour obtenir 
leur opinion. La seconde conference a permis d'en arriver a un texte definitif. De cette maniere, 
il a ete possible de concentrer l'audience sur les veritables motifs de controverse. 

On a egalement eu recours au reglement negocie lors des demandes relatives aux tarifs 
principaux presentees respectivement par Consumers Gas (pour l'exercice financier 1993) et 
Union (pour les exercices 1993 et 1994). Dans les deux cas, la Commission a fait en sorte que 
Ton negocie avant la tenue de l'audience afin d'en arriver a une entente dans autant de 
domaines que possible. Lors des seances de negociation, on a vu s'entendre des intervenants 
d'interets aussi divergents que l'Association des consommateurs du Canada (section de 
I'Ontario), Pollution Probe, Energy Probe, I'Ontario Coalition Against Poverty, l'Association des 
utilisateurs industriels de gaz et differentes societes fournisseuses. 

La Commission a juge encourageants les resultats de ces negociations, car elles ont a 
prime abord pennis de grandes economies de temps et d'argent lors des audiences. Nous avons 
toutefois souligne qu'elles ne sauraient toujours se substituer aux decisions de notre organisme. 
La loi exige que ces dernieres soient fondees sur notre propre etude de la preuve. Le fait que les 
parties se soient entendues sur un reglement ne nous justifie pas, en soi, d'avaliser ce dernier. 



18 



EXERCICES DE REFERENCE DE DEUX ANS 

Dans le passe, les tarifs que fixait la Commission etaient valides pour un an. En 1992-1993, 
elle a poursuivi ses experiences dans le but de rationaliser son processus de reglementation, 
notamment en etablissant des tarifs provisoires pour un an et en les fixant de maniere definitive 
en meme temps que ceux de Fannee suivante. Elle compte ainsi economiser temps et argent, en 
tenant une seule audience plutot que deux. 

La Commission a eu recours a cet exercice de reference modifie lors de son etude de la plus 
recente demande de hausse des tarifs principaux presentee par Union Gas a Fegard des exercices 
financiers 1993 et 1994. Elle a done fixe des tarifs provisoires pour 1993, lors d'une audience de 
moindre envergure, puis a tenu une seconde audience Fannee suivante pour etablir definitive- 
ment les hausses permises pour 1993 et 1994. 

LlGNES DIRECTRICES CONCERNANT LE RESPECT DES ENGAGEMENTS 

Chaque entreprise fournisseuse, de concert avec sa societe mere, s'est engagee aupres du 
lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil a respecter diverses lignes de conduite dans son exploitation. II 
arrive parfois que Tune d'entre elles demande a en etre libelee, par exemple pour accepter la 
soumission d'une societe affiliee ou pour investir dans un domaine non reglemente. 

Au cours de Fannee, la Commission a propose de nouvelles lignes directrices, concues pour 
aider les entreprises a mieux comprendre ce que Ton attend d'elles et pour permettre un examen 
des transactions en question. La Commission compte aussi, au cours de cet examen, etablir s'il y 
a lieu de conferer des exemptions permanentes et a quelles conditions. En agissant ainsi, la 
Commission pourrait s epargner les frais associes a Fetude de chaque transaction et permettrait 
aux entreprises de mieux saisir les occasions qui leur sont offertes dans les domaines approuves. 

AUTRES REFORMES 

La Commission a accompli cette annee de grands progres dans la modernisation de son sys- 
teme de surveillance de la situation financiere des societes de gaz. A Favenir, celles-ci auront 
moins de rapports a presenter au responsable des enquetes en matiere d'energie, mais elles 
devront lui communiquer des renseignements plus pertinents. La Commission exigera qu'on lui 
fournisse des previsions financieres plus precises, qui viendront s'ajouter aux resultats courants. 

Nous avons aussi, pour la premiere fois depuis le milieu des annees soixante, amorce une 
vaste reforme du systeme de comptabilite uniforme utilise par les entreprises de gaz dans la pro- 
duction de leurs donnees financieres. La ventilation des comptes prescrite par la Commission 
doit etre remaniee en fonction de f evolution des pratiques comptables, de la reglementation fis- 
cale et de Forganisation de Findustrie. 

Au milieu des annees quatre-vingt, la Commission avait mis au point une epreuve de fai- 
sabilite economique qui permettait d'etablir la viabilite commerciale de prolongements des 
reseaux de distribution et notamment de nouveaux gazoducs. Au cours de Fexercice, son person- 
nel a consulte plusieurs groupes pour raffiner la methodologie employee; il presentera ses 
recommandations a la Commission en 1993-1994. 



le processus d'audience 
Debut 

* presentation d'une demande de hausse de 
tarifs ou autre automation 

- renvoi du lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil 
oud'un ministre 

- decision interne de la Commission 

AVIS DE PRESENTATION 
D'UNE DEMANDE 

*■ par envoi a loutes les panics inieressecs oti 
par annoncc dans lesjoumaux 

Interventions 

- presentation, par tout inltnenant, (fun avis 
signi/uzret el motivant son intention de par- 

ticiper a une audience 

Documentation 
preparatoire 

* preuves produites par le requerant axanl 
I'audicncc 

- au besom, demandes de renseignements 
cpmplcmentaires de la part des inter- 
venants et de la Commission et presenta- 
tion des preuves. 

Audience sur l'aide finan- 
ciere ANTICIPEE 

- pour rcpondre aux demandes presentees 
par des intervenants 

RENCONTRES 
PREPARATOIRES 

> conferences techniques destinees a preciser 
la preuve 

> consultations dans le but de cerncr les 
enjeux 

" seances de negotiation prealables a 
I'audience. 

PRESENTATION DE LA 
PREUVE 

- comparution des temoins retcnus par le 
requerant, le personnel de la Commission 
c( les intervenants 

» contre-interrogatoires menes par le 

requerant, le personnel de la commission et 
les intervenants 

> plaidouies vcrbales et ccrites des panics 

DECISION ET RAPPORT DE LA 
COMMISSION 

> resument les enjeux et les arguments 

~ exposenl les conclusions et recommanda- 
tions ilc la Commission 

Ordonnance de la commis- 
sion 

- rend executoire la decision de la Commis- 
sion 



19 



ACTIVITES AU SEIN DE LA COMMU- 
NAUTE DES TRIBUNAUX ADMINISTRATIFS 

La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario compte parmi 
les 84 tribunaux de reglementation et d'adjudication 
de la province. elle intervient vigoureusement dans les cer- 
cles de la justice administrative, a l'echelle aussi bien 
provinciale que nationale et internationale. 

L'ACTIVITE ONTARIENNE 

En 1992-1993, le gouvemement de l'Ontario a entrepris une revision des programmes de ses 
organismes dans le cadre dun vaste projet devaluation du rendement de toutes ses activites. La pre- 
miere etape de cette initiative s'est deroulee sous l'egide dun comite de direction, lequel a forme cinq 
groupes de travail. La Commission a collabore sans hesiter au projet en participant aux deliberations de 
ces groupes. 

Les conclusions de l'etude ont ete presentees au Conseil de gestion du gouvemement et le 
Cabinet a donne son aval aux premieres recommandations portant sur la reorganisation des orga- 
nismes gouvernementaux. La seconde etape du projet, qui proposera des mesures de realisation, doit 
s'amorcer au cours de l'exercice 1993-1994. 

La Commission fait partie de la Society of Ontario Adjudicators and Regulators (SOAR) qui 
regroupe les presidents, les membres et le personnel de direction dorganismes du meme genre. La 
presidente de la Commission occupe la fonction de secretaire du comite des presidents de la SOAR. Le 
personnel de la Commission a participe a l'organisation de la conference annuelle des organismes 
publics ontariens qui s'est tenue a l'automne 1992. 
Activites au Canada 

La Commission s'interesse aux rjavaux de l'Association des membres de tribunaux d'utilite 
publique du Canada, qui recrute ses adherents a l'echelle federate et provinciale, principalement dans 
les secteurs de l'energie et des telecommunications. La presidente de la Commission dirige le comite 
des affaires energetiques de l'Association et fait partie du conseil de direction de celle-ci. 

Elle assure egalement la copresidence de la conference que doit tenir en 1993 le Conseil des tri- 
bunaux administratifs canadiens; celui-ci regroupe divers organismes relevant des autorites federales, 
provinciales et territoriales. 
Relations internationai.es 

La Commission de l'energie de l'Ontario s'est vu conferer le statut d'observatrice aupres 
de la National Association oj Regulatory Utility Commissioners. Quelques membres et 
employes de la Commission participent aux travaux de comites et de sous-comites de cet 
organisme americain. 



20 



Mesures de rationalisation 



Grace a son projet d echanges elcctroniques de donnees, la Commission est en voie d'automa- 
tiser ses audiences, ^initiative, etalee sur plusieurs annees, vise a : 

♦ equiper les salles d'audience de dispositifs permettant notamment le visionnement en direct 
des preuves; 

♦ etablir des communications electroniques entre la Commission et les intervenants a une au- 
dience, entre autres pour la correspondance et la production de la preuve; et a 

♦ permettre aux societes de services publics, aux intervenants et a la population de profiter d'un 
acces direct aux documents et renseignements importants que possede la Commission. 

Emulative a pour but de faire dune audience un outil plus efficace, mais aussi de proteger 
l'environnement, en reduisant l'utilisation du papier. 

Dans la foulee de ce projet, nous avons poursuivi en 1992-1993 la mise en oeuvre de notre 
systeme complet d'archivage et de consultation informatises de nos documents. Ce systeme com- 
prendra une base de donnees reunissant les decisions, rapports, transcriptions et autres docu- 
ments officiels de la Commission, que nous nous affairons a rassembler. Au cours de l'exercice, 
nous avons fait un inventaire complet du fonds documentaire que nous desirons reproduire en 
format electronique. 

Lorsqu'elle sera mise en service, cette base de donnees publique facilitera les recherches 
auxquelles doivent se livrer Findustrie, les intervenants et le personnel de la Commission. Elle 
acceptera non seulement les interrogations assez simples faites a laide de mots, comme c'est le 
cas actuellement, mais aussi realisera des reperages plus complexes fondes sur des concepts. 




Union Gas a re<;u une 
commande pour construire le 
premier compresseur triple au 
monde mu par un monoreacteur 
a ses installations du reseau 
Dawn. 



21 



Recapitulation des activites 



41 


™» 








- 


; 


«~ — - est is;-. ' 

mam mm r^ 2L 

^j Hi «g ilji 


I 



Une exposition organised par Ontario 
Hydro au palais des congres de la com- 
munautc urbaine dc Toronto mate les 
visitcurs a ctrc «econergiq\xes». 



Etude de la planification integree des ressources en gaz 

Dans toute l'Amerique du Nord, les instances publiques cherchent a concilier, dune part, la 
demande d'energie et, d'autre part, le cout de sa production et de son utilisation au plan de 
l'economie et de l'environnement. La planification integree des ressources est un nouvel outil 
qui pourrait permettre d'y parvenir. 

Jusqu'a recemment, on se contentait d'accroitre l'offre pour repondre a Faccroissement de la 
demande - dans le cas du gaz naturel, on creusait encore des puits, on trouvait de nouveaux 
lieux de stockage et on construisait d'autres gazoducs. La planification integree des ressources 
elargit la perspective, car elle exige que Ton prenne, pour satisfaire aux besoins prevus, des 
mesures agissant aussi bien sur la demande que sur l'offre dans la proportion qui garantira la 
limitation optimale des couts. Du cote de la demande, on peut par exemple accroitre l'efficacite 
energetique au moyen de chaudieres et appareils a haut rendement, ou encore mieux gerer les 
charges de maniere a reduire la consommation en periode de pointe, quand l'energie est la plus 
chere. 

La planification integree repose sur l'utilisation simultanee des ressources disponibles tant 
au niveau de la demande que de l'offre. Elle a pour objectif premier de faire realiser des 
economies au fouraisseur comme au consommateur, mais accorde toute l'importance voulue 
aux questions environnementales. 

En septembre 1991, la Commission publiait un document de travail portant sur la planifica- 
tion integree des ressources chez les societes de gaz naturel; les trois principales, ainsi que 
divers intervenants, groupes ecologistes et associations representant les consommateurs et les 
autochtones, ont fait valoir leur opinion a ce sujet. Apres ces consultations, la Commission a 
decide que ce nouveau mode de gestion serait mis en place progressivement. Elle s'est done 
penchee en premier lieu sur les moyens de gerer la demande; dans un deuxieme temps, elle 
s'interessera a l'offre et, dans un troisieme, a l'integration de tous ces aspects dans une politique 
globale. 

Lors de deux conferences techniques tenues respectivement en aout et en septembre 1992, 
les parties interessees ont eu l'occasion d'echanger leurs vues et d'en venir a certaines ententes 
au sujet des mesures de gestion de la demande. La Commission a aussi convoque une au- 
dience, qui s'est deroulee du 9 novembre au 4 decembre de la meme annee; en fin d'exercice, 
elle poursuivait son etude de la question afin d'en arriver a etablir des lignes directrices a 
l'intention des fournisseurs ontariens de gaz desireux de se doter officiellement de programmes 
de gestion de la demande. 
Audience generale : EBO 169, 169-11 et 169-111 

EXAMEN DES TARIFS DE VENTE EN GROS D'ONTARIO HYDRO 

En avril 1992, le ministre de l'Energie saisissait la Commission de la proposition faite par Ontario 
Hydro a regard de ses tarifs de vente d'electricite en gros. Cette societe disait vouloir relever ses tarifs 
de 8,6 pour 100 en moyenne a compter du l er Janvier 1993 pour faire face a des depenses prevues de 
9 017 millions de dollars, soit 796 millions de plus qu'en 1992. La hausse demandee devait produire 
des recettes nettes de 318 millions de dollars, soit 254 millions de dollars de moins que le niveau 
damortissement de la dette prevu par la loi, qui est de 572 millions de dollars. 

En juin 1992, Ontario Hydro a presente un dossier final complet mettant en evidence des besoins 
en revenus de 8 936 millions de dollars et une baisse des recettes nettes estimatives, qui passaient de 
318 a 269 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 1993. Selon ses previsions financieres corrigees, Ontario 



22 



Hydro aurait eu besoin dune hausse de tarifs de 14,5 pour 100 pour atteindre Fobjectif quelle s'etait 
fixee pour 1993 au plan du revenu net, soit 759 millions de dollars; une augmentation limitee a 
12,4 pour 100 lui aurait valu suffisamment de revenus pour respecter son niveau damortissement de la 
dette, tandis qu'une hausse de 9,2 pour 100 lui aurait permis de maintenir son revenu net a 
318 millions de dollars, comme elle se le proposait a Forigine. 

Le rapport de la Commission, publie en aout 1992, comportait dix-huit recommandations, dont 
sept touchaient les besoins en revenus d'Ontario Hydro. La Commission preconisait que la hausse de 
tarifs ne depasse pas 7,9 pour 100 et, a cette fin, priait Ontario Hydro de modifier ses previsions sur 
revolution future des taux d'interet et sur lecheancier de mise en service de sa nouvelle centrale de 
Darlington, et de reduire ses depenses au chapitre de lexploitation et de rentretien. 

La mise en oeuvre des recommandations de la Commission devait engendrer des recettes nettes de 
420 millions de dollars; accompagnees dun prelevement de 140 millions a meme la reserve de stabili- 
sation des tarifs et de provision pour eventualites, elles permettraient a Ontario Hydro de respecter le 
niveau corrige damortissement de sa dette, soit 560 millions de dollars. 

La Commission formulait egalement onze autres recommandations touchant lexploitation 
d'Ontario Hydro. 

Lune d'entre elles voulait que lors du prochain renvoi (HR 22), le ministre ordonne a la 
Commission d etudier le rapport entre le cout et le rendement des programmes composant le plan 
global de gestion energetique de la societe publique, lequel comporte des mesures visant la demande, 
notamment la conservation et l'utilisation plus efficace de lenergie. 

La Commission declarait qu'Ontario Hydro devait consacrer certaines ressources a 1 evaluation pe- 
riodique de ses programmes de gestion energetique. Elle lui demandait egalement de stimuler, dans la 
mesure de ses possibilites, la mise en oeuvre de son programme de substitution des combustibles pour 
encourager les consommateurs d electricite a adopter des sources denergie moins cheres. 

Au plan de la production delectricite par des entreprises privees, la Commission recommandait a 
Ontario Hydro de se fixer des objectifs destines a favoriser la mise en oeuvre de projets de moindre 
envergure, peu dommageables pour l'environnement et produisant d'interessants bienfaits sociaux. A 
une epoque marquee par la surcapacite, Ontario Hydro devrait cesser de participer financierement a 
des initiatives de production privee dune nature differente. 




Centrale nucleaire Darlington 
d'Ontario Hydro. 



23 




Consumers Gas a public un 
guide et un video sur lagestion 
de I'energie a domicile a/in 
d'aider ks consommateurs a 
utiliscr I'energie dejacon plus 
ejjicace. 



La Commission recommandait aussi que le ministre fasse modifier l'article 24 de la hoi sur la 
Societe de I'electricite de telle maniere que les conditions appliquees aux regimes de retraite soient con- 
formes a la Loi sur les regimes de retraite, surtout en ce qui concerne les contraintes visant l'utilisation 
eventuelle qu'Ontario Hydro ferait de tout surplus de la caisse de retraite. La Commission preconisait 
egalement qu'Ontario Hydro s'efforce de realiser des coupures tangibles et permanentes dans les 
depenses consacrees a ses programmes dexploitation et dentretien. 

Enfin, la Commission suggerait fortement a Ontario Hydro de reduire sa masse salariale pour la 
rendre plus compatible avec celle dautres organismes de meme envergure. Apres avoir examine les 
traitements verses aux dirigeants d'Ontario Hydro, la Commission a conclu qu'ils n'etaient pas exces- 
sifs, et notamment que ceux du president du conseil dadministration et du president de la societe 
etaient inferieurs aux salaires consentis dans dautres groupes d'entreprises. 
HR21 

Audiences relatives aux tarifs du gaz naturel 
Consumers Gas - Demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 

En juin 1992, la societe Consumers Gas demandait a la Commission de modifier son ordon- 
nance EBRO 473, qui fixait definitivement les tarifs quelle pouvait exiger pour Fexercice 
financier se terminant le 30 septembre suivant. Lentreprise voulait ainsi qu'une nouvelle ordon- 
nance traduise les effets de l'entente qu'elle avait conclue avec son principal fournisseur cana- 
dien, Western Gas Marketing Limited, et qui prevoyait une diminution du prix de l'approvision- 
nement a long terme de 1,91 $ a 1,70 $ le gigajoule pour la periode allant du l er juillet 1992 au 
l er novembre 1993. 

Lentente devait entrainer des economies totales de pres de 15 millions de dollars au cours 
de Fexercice 1992, mais exigeait que le rabais soit pris en compte dans le calcul du prix de 
reference regissant les achats faits par Consumers Gas en vue de la revente. 

La Commission a approuve l'entente, au vu de ses consequences sur le cout du gaz. 
EBRO 473-A (Decision prononcee verbalement le 21 aout 1992 et motivee par ecrit le 12 novembre 
suivant) 

Consumers Gas - Demande relative aux tarifs principaux 

En mars 1992, Consumers Gas priait la Commission de l'autoriser a augmenter ses tarifs 
pour fexercice financier 1993, a compter du l er octobre 1992. Le tableau qui suit decrit som- 
mairement les donnees financieres soumises a l'appui de cette demande. 

Dans Fun des volets de celle-ci, Consumers Gas desirait obtenir Faval de la Commission a 
l'egard des effets, sur le cout du gaz, de la deuxieme partie de l'entente conclue avec Western 
Gas Marketing Limited (WGML) dans le but de remanier le contrat d'approvisionnement a 
long terme unissant les deux entreprises. Ce contrat modifie faisait passer le prix moyen du gaz 
de 1,70 $ a 1,59 $ le gigajoule a compter du l er novembre 1992. 

La Commission a decide que les tarifs arretes pour Consumers Gas seraient provisoires et 
entreraient en vigueur le l er octobre 1992. Dans les motifs soutenant cette decision provisoire, 
la Commission a refuse d'approuver les consequences du remaniement du contrat sur le cout 
du gaz, jugeant que les modifications proposees viendraient singulierement en conflit avec les 
principes presidant a la fixation des tarifs et risquaient, a long terme, d'avoir des repercussions 
nefastes. Elle a conclu que le prix de 1,70 $ le gigajoule, prevu par l'entente prolonged origi- 
nale, etait raisonnable pour les approvisionnements de Fexercice financier 1993. 



24 



Consumers Gas : Sommaire des donnees financieres 
Exercice 1 993 



Demande 



en millions de dollars 



Autorise 



Assiette des tarifs 
Recettes de l'entreprise 
Insuffisance des recettes brutes 



2 078,7 




2 069,5 


202,4 




210,1 


58,9 




26.0 




en pourcentage 




9,74 




10,15 


11,34 




10,86 


35,51 




35,00 


13,375 




12,30 



Taux de rendement indique 

Taux de rendement necessaire 

Ratio d'endettement 

Taux cte rendemenules actions ordinaires 13,375 

EBRO 479 (Decision provisoire motivee le 12 novembre 1992 - Decision finale motiwe le 3 mars 1993) 

Centra - Demande relative aux tarifs principaux 

En juillet 1991, Centra a depose aupres de la Commission une demande de majoration tari- 
faire pour l'exercice commencant le l er Janvier 1992, calculee en fonction dune insuffisance de 
recettes de 32,5 millions de dollars. Apres la premiere deposition, Centra a negocie un prix de 
1,98 $ le gigajoule avec Western Gas Marketing Limited et a modifie son dossier de maniere a 
tenir compte du prix moins eleve du gaz, de meme que d'autres changements survenus dans la 
structure de son capital et dans son taux de rendement. 

Les principaux elements financiers de la decision prise par la Commission sont exposes 
dans le tableau qui suit. Celle-ci a par la meme occasion donne son aval aux repercussions de la 
renegociation du prix (a 1,98 $ le gigajoule) sur le cout du gaz. 

Centra : Sommaire des donnees financieres Exercice 1992 







Demande 


en millions de dollars 


Autorise 


Assiette des tarifs 




512,0 




511,4 


Recettes de l'entreprise 




52,1 




52,6 


Insuffisance des recettes brutes 




19,9 




14,0 








en pourcentage 




Taux de rendement indique 




10,18 




10,29 


Taux de rendement necessaire 




12,38 




11,84 


Ratio d'endettement 




38,00 




36,00 


Taux de rendement des actions 


ordinaires 


14,50 




13,50 



EBR0 174 (Decision du 22 ami 1992). 

Centra - Demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 

En octobre 1992, Centra deposait un avis de presentation de demande modifie et priait 
la Commission d'approuver les consequences, sur le cout du gaz, de l'entente quelle avait 
conclue avec Western Gas Marketing Limited (WGML) pour la periode debutant le 
l er novembre 1992. Cette entente visait a remanier le contrat a long terme d'approvision- 
nement unissant les deux entreprises et prevoyait une diminution du prix moyen du gaz a 
1,57 $ le gigajoule; elle instituait cependant des frais de 0,20 $ le gigajoule au titre de la 
reservation prolongee des approvisionnements, s'appliquant aux deux tiers du volume men- 




Un employe de Centra impede un 
generateur d'air pulse alimaite au 
gaznatwcl. 



25 



tionne dans le contrat. Advenant que la Commission refuse de donner son aval a cette mod- 
ification, on reviendrait au prix initial, soit 1,98 $ le gigajoule. 

Dans une decision provisoire, la Commission declarait quelle ne pouvait convenir des con- 
sequences du remaniement du contrat sur le cout du gaz, car les modifications en cause etaient 
incompatibles avec la structure tarifaire actuelle et allaient a l'encontre des principes presidant a la 
fixation des tarifs. Elle refusait egalement d'integrer, dans le calcul des tarifs, les consequences sur 
le cout du gaz decoulant du retour au prix original de 1,98 $ le gigajoule. 

La Commission affirmait qu'elle s'attendait de voir Centra reprendre ses negociations avec 
WGML a la premiere occasion et modifier a nouveau sa demande pour tenir compte des resultats 
de ces pourparlers. D'ici la, elle maintenait les tarifs provisoires actuels. 

En mars 1993, Centra presentait une demande modifiee conformement aux indications de la 
Commission. Celle-ci n'avait pas encore tenu d'audience a ce sujet a la fin de son exercice financier. 
EBRO 474-A (Decision provisoire du 1 1 Janvier 1993) 

Cardinal Power - Demande relative aux tarifs speciaux 

En fevrier 1992, Cardinal Power presentait une serie de demandes (EBLO 242 et suivantes) 
priant la Commission de l'autoriser a construire un gazoduc d'evitement du reseau de Centra et 
reliant celui de TransCanada PipeLines a une future centrale de regeneration lui appartenant en 
propre. Cette centrale de production d'electricite et de vapeur devait etre alimentee au gaz 
naturel. 

Avant la tenue de l'audience, Cardinal en vint a une entente avec Centra sur un tarif 
preferentiel d'evitement; en vertu de cet accord, Centra se chargerait de la construction et de 
Sexploitation du gazoduc, sous reserve que la Commission approuve le tarif convenu. 
Cardinal pria des lors la Commission de mettre ses demandes anterieures en suspens et, en 
aout 1992, lui presenta une demande modifiee afin qu'elle approuve le tarif concurrentiel de 
4,80 $ le millier de metres cubes exige par Centra pour l'evitement de son reseau. 

Eaudience a eu lieu en fevrier 1993; a la fin de l'exercice, la Commission n'avait pas encore 
rendu sa decision. 
EBRO 477. 

Union Gas - Demande relative aux tarifs principaux 

En septembre 1991, Union avait soumis a la Commission une demande portant sur la 
fixation de tarifs de vente, de distribution, de transport et de stockage de gaz pour les exer- 
cices financiers 1993 et 1994. Apres la presentation des dossiers, la Commission avait fixe des 
tarifs provisoires pour le premier de ces deux exercices, c'est-a-dire a compter du 
l er avril 1992. Elle avait convoque une seconde audience pour le debut de 1993 afin de fixer 
definitivement les tarifs autorises pour 1993 et 1994. 

En octobre 1992, Union presentait des pieces a l'appui de sa proposition de tarifs pour 
1994 en sus des chiffres mis a jour pour l'exercice 1993. Elle proposait egalement que ses ta- 
rifs definitifs de 1993 soient fixes au taux provisoire arrete precedemment, disant qu'elle 
remettrait a ses clients le surplus de recettes brutes de 2,332 millions de dollars ainsi engen- 
dre. 

Dans ses chiffres portant sur l'exercice financier 1994, Union prevoyait une insuffisance 
de recettes brutes de 32,899 millions de dollars. Eentreprise demandait a la Commission 
d'approuver certaines previsions, soit un taux de rendement de 13,75 pour 100, un ratio 



26 



'd'endettement de 29 pour 100 et une assiette des tarifs de 1,814 milliard de dollars. 

La seconde audience a eu lieu en fevrier 1993; en fin d'exercice, la Commission n'avait pas 
encore rendu de decision en cette matiere. 
EBRO 476. 

Union Gas - demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 

En juin 1992, Union presentait a la Commission une demande sollicitant son approbation 
provisoire a legard des consequences sur le cout du gaz de la renegociation et du remaniement 
de certains de ses contrats d'approvisionnement. Elle avait reussi a obtenir de Western Gas 
Marketing Limited une diminution de prix de 1,92 $ a 1,70 $ le gigajoule et des avantages sem- 
blables pour sept de ses autres contrats d'approvisionnement a long terme. Leffet estimatif de ces 
rabais, pour la periode allant du l er juillet 1992 au l er avril 1993, s'etablissait a environ 45 mil- 
lions de dollars. 

La Commission approuva les consequences de ces renegociations sur le cout du gaz, ainsi 
que l'entree en vigueur des nouveaux tarifs de vente a compter du l er septembre 1992. 
EBRO 476-02 (Decision prononcee verbalement le 31 juillet 1 992 et motivee par ecrit le 1 1 septembre suivant). 

COENTREPRISE UNION GAS ET DOW CHEMICAL CANADA - 
DEMANDE RELATIVE AUX TARIFS SPECIAUX 

Au debut de 1991, Union Gas et Dow Chemical formaient une coentreprise dans le but 
d'amenager et d'exploiter le reservoir bloc «A» de Samia. En mars 1992, elles presentaient con- 
jointement une demande d'ordonnance pour fixer les tarifs de stockage qu'elles pourraient exiger. 
Pour la periode visee dans la demande, Union Gas devait etre la seule a utiliser le reservoir. 

Dans sa decision, la Commission a diminue l'assiette des tarifs et les frais Sexploitation 
mentionnes dans la demande et declare que le taux de rendement des actions ordinaires de la 
coentreprise devait etre de 12,75 pour 100, soit de 0,75 pour 100 inferieur a celui d'Union, qui 
se situait provisoirement a 13,5 pour 100 au moment de la decision. 

La Commission a cependant approuve que le taux de rendement global produit par l'as- 
siette de tarifs soit de 1 1,45 pour 100 et que les besoins en revenus s'etablissent a 3,938 millions 
de dollars pour la periode comprise entre le 15 juillet 1992 et le 31 mars 1993. Elle decidait 
egalement que le taux de rendement de la coentreprise resterait de nature provisoire jusqu'a ce 
quelle se soit definitivement prononcee en cette matiere a legard d'Union et jusqu'a ce que les 
tarifs que pourrait exiger cette entreprise pour la livraison du gaz a la coentreprise aient ete 
determines 
EBRO 478 (Decision du 12 novembre 1992) 

demandes relatives a des gazoducs 

Consumers Gas - Renforcement du reseau Metro west 

Fin 1991, Consumers Gas priait la Commission de l'autoriser a construire une conduite de 
transport entre la ville de Mississauga et le poste de detente quelle comptait eriger au boulevard 
Widdicombe Hill dans la municipality d'Etobicoke. Par la meme occasion, elle demandait une 
autorisation semblable pour la construction d'une autre conduite de transport menant du poste 
de detente susmentionne jusqu'a Tangle des avenues St. Clair Ouest et Nairn, conduite qui serait 
dotee d'un raccordement au reseau de distribution haute pression situe a la convergence du 
chemin Martin Grove et de l'avenue Eglinton Ouest. 



27 



Consumers Gas a termine le 
projet de renforcement du 
reseau Metro West en 1992. 




Consumers Gas disait que ce projet, connu sous l'appellation de «renforcement Metro 
West», etait indispensable au maintien de la pression requise dans le reseau de distribution de 
la zone centrale de Toronto, dont il accroissait la capacite et garantissait Falimentation. 

Lors de Faudience, Consumers Gas presenta une demande modifiee qui indiquait un nou- 
vel emplacement pour le poste de detente, ce qui reduisait la longueur de la conduite de trans- 
port requise. La Commission approuva ce geste et autorisa Consumers Gas a realiser les 
infrastructures voulues, sous reserve du respect de certaines conditions. 
EBL0241 (Decision du 16 juin 1992) 

Union - Gazoduc reliant Bright a Owen Sound 

En septembre 1991, Union demandait a la Commission de Fautoriser a construire des con- 
duces supplementaires entre le poste surpresseur de Bright et la vanne de coupure de la conduite 
Owen Sound dans le reseau de transport Dawn-Trafalgar. La realisation du projet fut reportee 
jusqu'a Fete 1993 de facon que Ton puisse executer certains contrats de transport dans le reseau. 

La vocation premiere de ces nouvelles conduites etait dajouter a la capacite du reseau Dawn- 
Trafalgar, de sorte qu'Union puisse executer differents contrats de transport, et de repondre a la 
demande croissante dans la concession dont jouissait l'entreprise. La Commission a tenu une 
audience a ce sujet en mars 1993 et n'avait pas encore rendu de decision en fin d'exercice. 
EBLO240. 

Union - Gazoduc bickford-Dawn 

En juin 1992, Union priait la Commission de lui permettre d'eriger un gazoduc entre le 
poste surpresseur du reservoir de Bickford et celui du reseau de Dawn. Elle demandait egalement 
l'autorisation de construire plusieurs conduites de collecte assez courtes dans les limites memes 
du reservoir. Enfin, elle sollicitait de la part de la Commission un rapport favorable au ministre 
des Richesses naturelles pour Fobtention de permis autorisant le forage de six nouveaux puits 
d 'injection ou d'extraction dans le reservoir de Bickford. 



28 



Toutes ces installations visaient un meme but, soit accroitre la capacite de livraison du reser- 
voir, de maniere qu'Union puisse restreindre ses couts de stockage et ses frais connexes pendant 
Fete, a l'avantage ultime du consommateur. 

Laudience de la Commission a eu lieu a London (Ontario), en Janvier 1993. A la fin de Fexer- 
cice financier, aucune decision n'avait encore ete rendue. 
EBLO244/EBRM104. 

autres rapports 

Fusion de consumers Gas et de la societe Tecumseh 

En fevrier 1992, Consumers Gas s'adressait a la Commission pour obtenir du lieutenant-gou- 
vemeur en conseil la permission d'acquerir, par vente, location ou autre methode de cession, tout le 
reseau de transport et de stockage de gaz de Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited. Les deux entreprises 
demandaient aussi conjointement Fautorisation de fusionner leurs activites de stockage. 

Dans sa decision, la Commission recommandait au lieutenant-gouvemeur en conseil d'approuver 
les demandes de Consumers Gas et de Tecumseh. Elle soulignait qu'elle-meme et le lieutenant-gou- 
vemeur en conseil avaient deja etabli que la prise de controle de la seconde par la premiere ne 
desservirait pas Finteret public et qu'une fusion n'aurait en consequence aucun effet prejudiciable. Elle 
concluait quelle se pencherait sur les repercussions de Foperation sur la clientele lors de sa prochaine 
etude des tarifs de Consumers Gas. 

Le lieutenant-gouverneur en conseil accueillit done les deux demandes et, le 30 septembre 1992, 
Consumers Gas prit en main les actifs et ['exploitation de Tecumseh. 
EB0173(9juinl992). 

Cession a Consumers Gas des autorisations donnees par la 
Commission a Tecumseh 

En aout 1992, Tecumseh et Consumers Gas presentaient une nouvelle demande a la 
Commission, cette fois pour faire approuver la cession, a la seconde, de toutes les autorisations 
accordees a la premiere par la Commission. La fusion des deux entreprises exigeait en effet le trans- 
fert a Consumers Gas des permis visant Finjection, le stockage et Fextraction du gaz dans trois lieux 
de stockage designes. 

La Commission emit une ordonnance autorisant toutes les parties interessees a presenter des 
preuves ecrites relativement a la demande. A la fin de son exercice, elle n'avait pas encore rendu de 
decision. 
EB0176. 

Union - Reservoir de stockage Edys Mills 

En mars 1992, Union presentait a la Commission un ensemble de demandes dans le but d'obtenir les 
autorisations requises pour la designation du reservoir Edys Mills aux fins du stockage et de son 
exploitation. Elle priait egalement la Commission de lui permettre de construire une conduite de trans- 
port et un reseau de conduites de collecte. Au mois de juin suivant, le ministre des Richesses naturelles, 
par renvoi, demandait a la Commission d'etudier en meme temps une autre demande d'Union, celle-la 
portant sur le forage de trois puits au reservoir Edys Mills dans le cadre dun projet d'expansion des acti- 
vites de stockage. 

Quand son amenagement sera termine, le reservoir Edys Mills disposera dune capacite exploitable 
de 58 500 milliers de metres cubes de gaz. Union allegua que les installations projetees etaient indispen- 




Pendant I'annee, Union a amenage le 
reservoir de stockage de gaz Edys 
Mills. 



29 



sables, car elles lui permettraient de repondre a raccroissement de la demande en 1994 et garantiraient 
une meilleure fiabilite des approvisionnements. 

Apres l'audience qui eut lieu a Sarnia, la Commission recommanda au lieutenant-gouverneur en 
conseil daccueillir favorablement les demandes; le Reglement de l'Ontario 719/93 designa done le 
reservoir Edys Mills aux fins du stockage du gaz. La Commission conseilla egalement au ministre des 
Richesses naturelles d'accorder les permis de forage demandes. 

La Commission rouvrit l'audience en decembre 1992 pour entendre les representations d'Union; 
Fentreprise aurait omis de demander le permis requis du comte de Lambton avant de proceder a l'ame- 
nagement du terrain en vue de la construction du poste de surpression projete. La Commission 
enjoignit egalement Union de lui confirmer par ecrit que toutes les autres conditions qui lui avaient ete 
imposees dans cette affaire avaient ete respectees. Union lui fit ulterieurement parvenir la confirmation 
demandee. 

En fevrier 1993, la Commission emit une ordonnance permettant a Union d'injecter du gaz dans le 
reservoir et de construire les installations requises. 
EBOm/EBLOm/EBRM103. 



30 



LlSTE DES CAS TRAITES 



Le tableau ci-dessous recense tous les cas traites par la Commission suite a des demandes ou ades renvois 
durant l'exercice termine le 31 mars 1993. Y figurent egalement les cas traites au cours de l'exercice 1992-1993 
bien que deposes durant les annees anterieures. 



TYPE DE CAS N° DE DOSSIER REQUERANT 



OBJET 



Demandes de revision des tarifs de transport/distribution 


de gaz naturel 


EBRO 473-A 


Consumers Gas 


Demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 


EBRO 474 


Centra 


Demande relative aux tarifs 
principaux - exercice 1992 


EBRO 474-A 


Centra 


Demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 


EBRO 476 


Union 


Demande relative aux tarifs principaux 
- exercices 1993 et 1994 


EBRO 476-02 


Union 


Demande relative aux tarifs provisoires 


EBRO 477 


Cardinal Power 


Demande relative aux tarifs speciaux 


EBRO 478 


Union 


Coentreprise Union - Dow Chemical Canada 
- Demande relative aux tarifs speciaux 


EBRO 479 


Consumers Gas 


Demande relative aux tarifs principaux - exercice 1993 


Renvoi de la part du ministre de 1 


'Energie au sujet d'Ontario Hydro 


HR 21 


Ontario Hvdro 


Tarifs de vente en gros - exercice 1993 


Constructions de gazoducs 






EBLO 240 


Union 


Gazoduc de Bright a Owen Sound 


EBLO 241 


Consumers Gas 


Renforcement du reseau Metro West 


EBLO 244 


Union 


Gazoduc Bickford - Dawn 


Audience generale 






EBO 169, 169-11, 169-111 


Commission 
de lenergie de 
l'Ontario 


Planification integree des ressources en gaz 


Autres rapports 






EBO 173 


Consumers Gas 


Fusion avec Tecumseh 


EBO 174/EBLO 243/EBRM 103 


Union 


Reservoir Edys Mills 


EBO 176 


Tecumseh 


Cession des autorisations a Consumers Gas 



Nouvelles concessions et certificats d'interet public et de necessite 

EBA660/EBC201 Centra Canton d'Atwood 

EBA 661/EBC 202 Centra Canton de Dilke 

EBA 662/EBC 203 Centra Canton de La Vallee 

EBA 663 Centra Canton de Neebring 

EBA 664 Centra Canton de Shuniah 

Renouvellement des accords de concession 



EBA 


447 modifie 


Centra 


Canton d'Alberton 


EBA 


629 


Centra 


Village de Frankford 


EBA 


630 


Union 


Village de Chatsworth 


EBA 


631 


Union 


Canton d'Egremont 


EBA 


632 


Union 


Canton de Maryborough 


EBA 


633 


Union 


Canton de Minto 


EBA 


634 


Union 


Canton de Peel 


EBA 


635 


Union 


Canton de Zorra 


EBA 


636 


Union 


Ville de Hanover 


EBA 


637 


Union 


Ville de Mount Forest 


EBA 


638 


Union 


Ville de Palmerston 



31 



TYPE DE CAS 


N° DE DOSSIER 


REQUERANT 


OBJET 


Renouvellement des accords de concession (cont'd) 




EBA 


639 


Union 


Comte de Middlesex 


EBA 


640 


Union 


Village d' Arthur 


EBA 


641 


Union 


Ville de Harriston 


EBA 


642 


Union 


Comte de Brant 


EBA 


643 


Union 


Comte de Perth 


EBA 


644 


Union 


Ville de Durham 


EBA 


645 


Union 


Canton dArtur 


EBA 


646 


Union 


Village de Drayton 


EBA 


647 


Union 


Ville de Windsor 


EBA 


648 


Union 


Canton de Sydenham 


EBA 


649 


Union 


Canton de Normanby 


EBA 


650 


Union 


Comte de Grey 


EBA 


651 


Union 


Canton de Sullivan 


EBA 


652 


Union 


Canton de Bentinck 


EBA 


653 


Union 


Canton de Holland 


EBA 


654 


Union 


Canton de Wilmot 


EBA 


655 


Union 


Ville de Listowel 


EBA 


656 


Union 


Canton de Southwold 


EBA 


657 


Union 


Ville de West Luther 


EBA 


658 


Union 


Canton de Metcalfe 


EBA 


659 


Union 


Canton de Wallace 


Certifkats d'interet public et de necessite 




EBC 


lll/119Reouvert Natural Resource Gas 


Canton de Southwest Oxford 


EBC 


151 modifie 


Centra 


Canton dAlberton 


EBC 


200 


Centra 


Village de Frankford 


Exemptions relatives a des gazoducs 




PL 


80 


Consumers Gas 


Poste de Dixie South 



Ordonnances de comptabilite uniforme 

UA 89 Consumers Gas 

UA 90 Centra 



Compte de report des economies d'impot 
Compte de report des couts d'intervention PIR 



Autorisation des 


activates en cour; 






EBRLG 


28-D 


Union 


Demandesdesoumissionsd'approvisionnementen gaz 


EBRLG 


28-E RETIREE 


Union 


Westcoast Energy Inc. 


EBRLG 


034-03 


Centra 


Pret au personnel - 25 000 $ 


EBRLG 


034-04 


Centra 


Pret au personnel - 20 000 $ 


EBRLG 


034-05 


Centra 


Pret au personnel - 25 000 $ 


EBRLG 


034-06 


Centra 


Westcoast Energy Inc. 


EBRLG 


35-10 


Consumers Gas 


Niagara Gas - Projet de la riviere des Outaouais 


EBRLG 


35-11 


Consumers Gas 


Great West Energy - Achat de gaz 


EBRLG 


35-12 


British Gas 


GW Utilities 


EBRLG 


35-13 


Consumers Gas 


Achats de gaz au comptant 



32 



Intervenants 



Sont enumeres ci-dessous les personnes, organismes et societes qui se sont presentes au 
moins une fois devant la Commission de 1 energie de TOntario au cours de lexercice 1992-1993. 



A.E. Sharp Limited 

A.E. Sharp & Associates Ltd. 

Admic Controls 

Algoma Steel Corporation, Limited 

Association canadienne du gaz 

Association des consommateurs industriels de gaz 

Association des consommateurs du Canada (Section 

de l'Ontario) 

Association of Major Power Consumers of Ontario 

Bickford Dawn Group 

Boise Cascade Canada Ltee 

Canadian Association of Energy Service Companies 

Cardinal Power L.P 

Centra Gas Ontario Inc. 

Coalition of Environmental Groups for a Sustainable 

Energy Future 

Conseil de l'education de la ville de York 

Conseil des ecoles catholiques du Grand Toronto 

Consumers Fight Back Association 

Consumers' Gas Company Ltd. 

Corporation de la ville de Fort Frances 

Destec Energy Canada 

Direct Energy Marketing Limited 

Domtar Inc. 

Dow Chemical Canada Inc. 

ECNG Inc. 

Energy Probe 

Environmental Assessment Group 

Fair Rental Policy Organization of Ontario 

Gaz Metropolitain, inc. 

Great West Energy Limited 

Independent Power Producers Society of Ontario 

Lake Superior Power Inc. 

Lang, W. 

Municipal Electric Association 

Municipality de la communaute urbaine de Toronto 



Munigas Corporation 

Murphy, C. 

Mutual Gas Association 

Natural Resource Gas Limited 

Nitrochem Inc. 

North Canadian Marketing Inc. 

North Canadian Power 

Northland Power 

Northridge Petroleum Marketing Inc. 

Ontario Coalition Against Poverty 

Ontario Hospital Association 

Ontario Hydro 

Ontario Natural Gas Association 

Ottawa/Carleton Gas Purchase Consortium 

Petro-Canada 

Pollution Probe 

Produits forestiers Canadien Pacifique Limitee 

Seaway Valley Farmers Energy Cooperative 

Taxpayers Coalition of Brampton 

Tecumseh Gas Storage Limited 

Toronto District Heating Corporation 

TransCanada PipeLines Limited 

TWG Consulting Inc. 

Unigas Corporation 

Union Gas Limited 

Urban Development Institute of Ontario 

Ville de Toronto 

Wade, L 

Western Gas Marketing Limited 



33 



Lexique 



ASSIETTE DES TARIFS 

Montant investi par une entreprise de services publics dans les biens utilises pour fournir des 
services, moins ramortissement cumule, plus le montant consacre au fonds de roulement-et 
tout autre poste retenu par la Commission. Lassiette des tarifs peut egalement etre nette 
d'impots sur le revenu reportes et cumules. 
BESOINS en revenus 

Revenus que l'entreprise de services publics doit realiser par l'entremise de tarifs pour amortir 
les couts de service. Ces revenus sont calcules en ajoutant les depenses permises de l'entreprise 
et le rendement approuve selon lassiette des tarifs. 

EXERCICE DE REFERENCE 

Periode de douze mois consecutifs (en regie generate, le prochain exercice financier complet de 
l'entreprise) pour laquelle des previsions des revenus, des couts, des depenses et de lassiette 
des tarifs sont examinees par la Commission en vue de la definition des tarifs que peut exiger 
une entreprise de services publics. 

GlGAJOULE (GJ) 

Unite de mesure dune quantite d'energie egale a un milliard (10 9 ) de joules. Un abonne resi- 
dentiel type consomme environ 130 gigajoules par an pour chauffer sa residence. 

INSUFFISANCE DE RECETTES 

Difference entre le niveau de revenu necessaire pour obtenir le taux de rendement annuel per- 
mis, tel qu'etabli par la Commission, et celui qui sera obtenu avec les tarifs approuves en 
vigueur. 

Ratio d'endettement 

Rapport entre la valeur des actions ordinaires emises et la somme des avoirs d'une societe. 
Taux de rendement des actions ordinaires 

Niveau de revenu reel ou autorise d'une entreprise de services publics exprime en pourcentage 
de la valeur des actions ordinaires quelle est autorisee a inclure dans la structure de son capi- 
tal. 

Taux de rendement indique 

Taux de rendement d'une entreprise de services publics compte tenu des tarifs pratiques con- 
formement a la tarification approuvee. 
Taux de rendement necessaire 

Taux de rendement qu'une entreprise de services publics estime devoir realiser pour degager 
un rendement suffisant compte tenu des projections. 
Taux de rendement sur l'assiette des tarifs 
Revenus apres impot, exprimes en pourcentage de l'assiette des tarifs, qu'une entreprise de ser- 
vices publics gagne ou est autorisee a gagner. Ce rendement n'est pas garanti, mais correspond 
au rendement auquel l'entreprise peut raisonnablement s'attendre compte tenu des conditions 
prevues. 



34